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Artists Open Studios - 22/23 and 29/30 March 2014

Artists Open Studios
Two weekends: 22/23 and 29/30 March 2014

Around 100 local and visiting artists will again participate in the annual Artists Open Studios event. Their work can be seen, and purchased, through the 69 studios, which will open their doors to the public over the last two weekends in March. While many of the studios are regular contributors to this event there are several new ones to visit this year.

This is the fourteenth year Whanganui has hosted Artist Open Studios offering a wide range of mediums including glass, mosaic, painting, pottery and photography. The number of artists and visitors to the region has grown over the years ensuring Whanganui’s standing as the premier arts destination of New Zealand.

During the two weekends local cafes, tourist attractions, restaurants and accommodation providers will be keen to ensure visitors have a relaxed and enjoyable time.

A 2014 Arts Trail Guide is available on the Artists Open Studios web site www.openstudios.co.nz.

An exhibition not to miss!
Entries into the Chair project exhibition and competition are coming in fast. We now have:
Plimmerton artist Rachel Wybourne-Curtin


Rachel’s piece called "”Complex Linkage” took her over 80 hours to make and is created from the chair and a mannequin with over 130 metres of 1970s plastic coated cane. The wearable hat is woven over a block shape, a retro designed banana/gondola basket, the dress knitted on modified large dowel needles and laced together. The chair was wrapped and given a woven covering.
Rachel’s usual art is made from natural fibres, most often cane, rush and sea grass though she has used other materials such as wool, plastics, weed matting.
The finished dimensions of the piece are 1700mm x 700mm x 1200mm.

New Plymouth artist Catherine Dunn


Catherine’s piece called "The Lepidopterist trap" is made from the chair, fiberglass, paper Mache, crocheted jute and wool. Using fiberglass was a first for Catherine whose creations usually include recycled materials, painting and sculpture.

“Once I became more confident with handling fibre glass the piece came together quite fast. It was such a fun project that I couldn’t leave it alone.

“The basic structure was completed over a long weekend, and I have been working on it for about a month in and around the many tasks and responsibilities of being a wife and mother,” says Catherine.

The finished dimensions of the piece are 850mm x700mm x 1200mm.

Auckland artist Julliette Laird


Julliette’s piece called "Unknown Crustacean Discovered in Hobbyist’s Basement" is made from the chair, paper (books, card, magazines), glue, masking tape, irrigation pipe, sink strainers, wire and paint.

“I set out to create a paper mache shell of the chair from two outdated DIY books. Very quickly a creature began to take shape, and it was quite different from the woodwork and sewing projects described in the old books,” says Julliette.

“I enjoy the playfulness of paper mache, and the interest added by the segments of the written word that catch the eye. By letting the subconscious work on the very mundane materials, the process gave the old chair new life,” added Julliette.

When she was invited to participate her first idea was to make a paper mache replica of the chair. She had done this with a wooden desk in 2011 and discovered the playfulness of paper mache.

“I like paper mache because it is both fragile and surprisingly strong – and interestingly the Victorians made furniture from paper mache.”

The finished dimensions of the piece are 800 x 800 x 1250 mm.

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