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I, Monster

I, MONSTER
Created and performed by Kyah Dove

Man, Monster, Machine. Contemporary dancer and performance artist Kyah Dove traverses the landscape of being human in this graphically intense and highly physical body of work.

From the 19th-22nd of March Bats Theatre will become a distorted reality saturated with shopping trolleys, TV screens, wigs, mannequins and masks, not to mention a level of dance and spoken word that is of an exceptional calibre.

Dove’s solo work I, Monster was first performed in Melbourne during April 2013. It has since mutated to new levels of embodiment after Dove, who is a graduate of the New Zealand School of Dance, spent three months undergoing a choreographic internship in Berlin, Germany.

“I view my art as a means of passage through which activism, healing and transformation manifest within my life” Says Dove.

She is seeking performance at its most pure; it’s ecstatic core. Her intention is to birth and craft all material from the most raw, honest and self-exposing state possible. I, Monster constantly asks the question; ‘who is the artist and who is the con artist’- who is truthful and who is disguising.

This performance is not a finished product and never intends to be. “Where creativity is concerned there is no ending, no result; no conclusion”.

I, Monster is a revelation. It asks the audience to bear witness as the Monster explores and examines the process of being human in its poignant beauty, its horror, its vulnerability.

Explicit, intimate and deeply personal this show is not to be missed!


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