Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Waikato engineering students tramp 3000km in 100 days


17 March, 2014


Waikato engineering students tramp 3000km in 100 days


Three thousand kilometres, about six million steps, 100 days and two pairs of destroyed shoes.

Ambitious University of Waikato fourth-year mechanical engineering students Kendall Bristow and Luke Sinclair decided to forgo the typical working summer holiday for a tramping expedition from Cape Reinga to Bluff.

The walk involved followed the Te Araroa trail, a recently opened New Zealand long trail, which runs from the top of the north to the bottom of the south, snaking its way through bush, mountains, farms, beaches and the odd road.

“I originally came across the idea of doing the Te Araroa trail online and jokingly mentioned it to Luke as something we could do. After hearing about our potential plans for the walk, a local Institute for Professional Engineers (IPENZ) member suggested to me at the University’s Engineering Design Show, that we use this adventure to raise money for Oxfam’s Water for Survival Programme,” says Kendall.

Within two weeks the joke had become a reality and after finishing off exams at Waikato University, they were on their way. The two began on November 7 and by December 23, had completed the North Island leg. They decided to take the Christmas and New Year period off, before setting off again and finishing at Bluff on February 28, ready for the start of classes back in Hamilton on March 3.

“I worked out that we spent 95 days actually walking and five days paddling the Whanganui River in a canoe. We met so many interesting, helpful people during the tramp. There were the other trampers completing the walks, the hunters that shared their food when we miscalculated our rations, and those who let us camp on their lawns,” says Luke.

“We also experienced the most amazing scenery, with our favourites being the coastal walks in Northland and the high country tracks in the South Island. All of this made our trip a once in a lifetime experience.”

But with the highs, also came the lows, with Luke suffering from food poisoning near Te Kuiti. “We just had to keep going, as we’d booked in canoes at Taumarunui to paddle down the river to Whanganui, and knew that if we didn’t keep up at least 30km per day, then we wouldn’t make it to Bluff within the 100 days we’d planned,” says Luke.

“Many of the tracks weren’t really tracks at all and we did a lot of bush bashing to get through some areas. The scariest part was through Harper’s Pass, near Arthur’s Pass in the South Island. The rain became torrential and the rivers came up really fast,” says Kendall.

The two former Pukekohe High School students raised over $800 for OxFam. “Although this was less than we had hoped, we felt it was a good effort considering we had only two weeks between deciding to go and setting off.”

View more photos from the tramp at www.facebook.com/walkingthecloud

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Ko Witi Te Kaituhituhi

Witi Ihimaera, the distinguished Māori author and the first Māori to publish a book of short stories and a novel, has adopted a new genre with his latest book. But despite its subtitle, this book is a great deal more than a memoir of childhood. More>>

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Film Awards: The Dark Horse Scores Big

An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach Genesis Potini, made all the right moves to take out top honours along with five other awards at the Rialto Channel New Zealand Film Awards - nicknamed The Moas. More>>

ALSO:

Theatre: Ralph McCubbin Howell Wins 2014 Bruce Mason Award

The Bruce Mason Playwriting Award was presented to Ralph McCubbin Howell at the Playmarket Accolades in Wellington on 23 November 2014. More>>

ALSO:

One Good Tern: Fairy Tern Crowned NZ Seabird Of The Year

The fairy tern and the Fiji petrel traded the lead in the poll several times. But a late surge saw it come out on top with 1882 votes. The Fiji petrel won 1801 votes, and 563 people voted for the little blue penguin. More>>

Music Awards: Lorde Reigns Supreme

Following a hugely successful year locally and internationally, Lorde has done it again taking out no less than six Tuis at the 49th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news