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National Art Award encourages artists to get wired

18 March 2014

National Art Award encourages artists to get wired

Entries for the Fieldays No. 8 Wire National Art Awards are now open and with a cash first prize double that of last year, organisers are looking forward to the ingenious and unique exhibits that the awards are known to attract.

Held annually around the Fieldays event, the No. 8 Wire National Art Award challenges artists to create artworks using predominantly No. 8 Wire. The awards have become a highlight on the national art calendar, offering artists the opportunity to turn their hand to something unique while pushing the physical and conceptual boundaries of the iconic Kiwi agricultural product.

Judging the 2014 competition is acclaimed sculptor Greer Twiss, who has exhibited for over 50 years and was one of the first New Zealand artists to work in cast bronze. Once called New Zealand’s ‘Godfather’ of contemporary sculpture, in 2002 he was made an Officer of the Order of Merit (ONZM) for sculpture in the Queen's Birthday Honours.

Twiss says he is looking forward to judging, “No.8 wire is an iconic concept material. The romantic implications of its use go way beyond the reality of the farm fence. The influence of materials that carry associations far from art interests me greatly - this is one of those materials. I am a maker and this material is all about making and making do.”

The New Zealand National Fieldays Society is proud to partner with the Waikato Museum and ArtsPost Galleries & Shop to organise the No.8 National Art Award. Waikato Museum Director Cherie Meecham welcomes the opportunity to work with Fieldays again.

“Waikato Museum and Fieldays have redeveloped the iconic Fieldays No.8 Wire National Art Award to ensure its ongoing success. We look forward to working with them and judge Greer Twiss to present a must-see award exhibition at ArtsPost in June this year.”

With an impressive prize pool up for grabs organisers are expecting a significant number of exciting entries.

The No.8 Wire National Art Award prize giving ceremony will be held on Thursday 5 June, 6pm at ArtsPost Galleries & Shop, part of the Waikato Museum arts precinct on Victoria Street, Hamilton. A free public exhibition will be held at ArtsPost from Friday 6 June to Monday 7 July 2014.

2014 Competition Details
First prize: $8,000
Second prize: $1,000
Third prize: $500
To read the competition criteria and download an entry form please visit www.fieldays.co.nz/enterno8wire

Entries close: Friday 2 May 2014
Finalists announced: Friday 16 May 2014
Prize giving ceremony: Thursday 5 June 2014
Exhibition: Friday 6 June to Monday 7 July 2014
Venue: ArtsPost Galleries & Shop, Hamilton

KEY INFORMATION:
Fieldays 11-14 June 2014

www.fieldays.co.nz
Stay a step ahead at Fieldays; Your Global Agribusiness Event

The New Zealand National Fieldays® Society is a charitable organisation founded in 1968 for the purpose of advancing primary industry.

NZ National Fieldays will be held 11-14 June 2014 at Mystery Creek Events Centre. Located just ten minutes from Hamilton, Mystery Creek Event Centre’s purpose built facility is the ideal venue for the largest agricultural event in the Southern Hemisphere.

The event is proudly supported by strategic partners - ANZ and the University of Waikato.

2013 winners
1st - Louise Purvis No. 8 Construction
2nd - Arthur Mahutariki Embedded
3rd - Jane Pouls and Dave Sole The Bird has Flown

ENDS

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