Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Dunedin submits UNESCO City of Literature bid

Dunedin submits UNESCO City of Literature bid

Dunedin, 19 March 2014 – Mayor Dave Cull today formally sent Dunedin’s application to become a city of literature to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) on behalf of the city.

UNESCO’s Creative Cities Network aims to promote cultural diversity and sustainable urban development through the creative economy in cities around the world, but only one city in each country will be recognized as a Creative City of Literature.

Mr Cull says a steering committee and an advisory board of writers, librarians and academics from a range of Dunedin’s institutions have been feverishly collaborating over the last six months to complete the bid which highlights Dunedin’s rich literary heritage.

“I’m inspired by this bid. Dunedin has been, and still is, home to many of New Zealand’s well known writers, poets and playwrights, so it should be New Zealand’s City of Literature. Thomas Bracken, who wrote New Zealand’s national anthem, Charles Brasch, founder of the country’s foremost literary journal, internationally acclaimed writers Janet Frame and James K. Baxter and current and former poet laureates Vincent O’Sullivan, Hone Tuwhare, Brian Turner and Cilla McQueen have all called Dunedin home.”

Six existing Cities of Literature have all supported Dunedin’s bid including Iowa City, Reykjavik, Dublin, Melbourne, Norwich and Edinburgh.

City of Literature bid coordinator, Liz Knowles, says the bid is an exciting opportunity to showcase Dunedin’s literature on a global platform and to show the wider city, its arts and culture to the world.

“To become a UNESCO designated City of Literature, a city has to bring together its entire literary community and secure support from council, government and its national bodies. To be successful we have to highlight the quality, quantity and diversity of the city’s publishing, the quality of our literary educational programmes, and our ability to preserve, promote and disseminate literature through our libraries, bookstores, new media and collections.”

Mr Cull says being named a City of Literature would be a fantastic acknowledgement of the city’s literary heritage and dynamic creative communities, and add another string to its bow as it strives to become one of the best small cities in the world.

The bid document will now be assessed by UNESCO over the coming months, with additional information to be provided if requested and the outcome of the bid will be announced in November.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news