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Archival documentary gives intriguing look at 1950s Auckland

March 20, 2014

Archival documentary to give intriguing look at 1950s Auckland at Silo Park screening this March

Heritage Short Film; PACIFIC MAGAZINE 23: REPORT ON AUCKLAND (1956)
Silo Cinema, Friday 28 March, 9:00pm

The New Zealand Film Archive has joined forces with The New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) and Silo Park to provide a unique opportunity for Aucklanders to step back in time.

A special viewing of an archival mid-century documentary Pacific Magazine 23: Report on Auckland is scheduled as part of the regular free Silo Cinema on Friday 28 March focusing on urban design.

The report-style short made in 1956 provides an intriguing snapshot of how Aucklanders lived at the time. Highlights include development of the Auckland Harbour Bridge, mid-century architecture, urban drift, motorway design and the specific development pressures of the 1950s.

“The film provides a very relevant background to many of the urban development issues that are still high priority issues today, such as housing and transport,” says the New Zealand Historic Places Trust’s Mid Northern Area Coordinator, Judy Grieve.

“This 1950s point of view on social and economic development in Auckland underlines the historical influences that have shaped our growth from a population then of 380,000 to over 1.5 million today. It also highlights how our thinking has changed – especially in relation to cultural, environmental and conservation issues”

Archival films like this provide a valuable link to our past and communicate our stories, according to The Film Archive’s Programmes Developer, Paula Booker.

Report on Auckland provides an entertaining and useful perspective on our city during the boom times of the mid-20th century. It tracks our development into the vibrant, multicultural city that we are today. The historic Silo Cinema provides the perfect site for this free public event,” adds Paula.

The 10-minute documentary will be the first screening in a free public event focusing on urban design, which will also feature the film The Human Scale (by Danish architect and Professor Jan Gehl), along with a Pecha Kucha session featuring a fast-paced, energetic session of engaging speakers including:

Dr. Stephen Rainbow, General Manager Strategy, Waterfront Auckland: “Great design, sustainability and commercial development”
James Samuel, Food Forest NZ: “Urban food: creative and fun”
Bevan Woodward, Project Director, Sky Path: “The Sky Path and the plan to transform Auckland into a cycle-friendly, walkable city”
Alastair Jamieson, Ecologist and photographer: “The volcanoes in our backyard”
Julie Anne Genter, Transport planner and Green MP: “Improving the user-friendliness of Auckland”

For more information visit www.silopark.co.nz

ENDS

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