Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Books to devour, literally

Books to devour, literally

Life of Pi was one of the favourite literary-inspired creations at CPIT’s 2013 Edible Book Festival.]

Devouring a good book takes on a different meaning at CPIT when staff and students present witty and creative interpretations of literary favourites for the Edible Book competition on 1 April.

The international event, which will be held outside the Madras Street library encourages people to recreate a favourite book title or text as something edible or in the form of a book.

Last year Joseph Heller’s well-known satirical novel Catch 22 inspired the winning entry - a cake adorned with a man fishing and a pile of, you guessed it, 22 (chocolate) fish. Other entries in the highly successful event included carefully crafted pieces such as The Thorn Birds (a collection of chocolate birds studded with chocolate thorns) and more conceptual entries such as The Life of Pi (a plastic tiger and a meat pie), Dangerous Liaisons (baking powder and vinegar - displayed separately) and Gone With the Wind (an open tin of baked beans).

This year the judges, writer and columnist Joe Bennett, The Press Zest editor Kate Fraser and a CPIT representative, will again be looking for the funniest, most delectable and most imaginative entries. The public also get to vote on a People’s Choice Award.

“The library decided to hold the International Edible Book Festival again as it was a great deal of fun last year. It is a great opportunity to work closely with our colleagues at Food and Hospitality and host an event that is open to students and staff across all of CPIT,” Julie Humby, CPIT Art Curator and Library Promotions, said.

After judging, the Edible Books will indeed be devoured. Winners will be announced at 12.15pm.

The International Edible Book Festival is held on 1 April for two reasons according to the event’s founders Judith A. Hoffberg and Béatrice Coron. Firstly, it is the birthday of French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), famous for his witty meditation on food, Physiologie du goût. And secondly, it’s April Fools' Day – a time of pranks and playfulness. The event is now held in at least 23 countries.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news