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Books to devour, literally

Books to devour, literally

Life of Pi was one of the favourite literary-inspired creations at CPIT’s 2013 Edible Book Festival.]

Devouring a good book takes on a different meaning at CPIT when staff and students present witty and creative interpretations of literary favourites for the Edible Book competition on 1 April.

The international event, which will be held outside the Madras Street library encourages people to recreate a favourite book title or text as something edible or in the form of a book.

Last year Joseph Heller’s well-known satirical novel Catch 22 inspired the winning entry - a cake adorned with a man fishing and a pile of, you guessed it, 22 (chocolate) fish. Other entries in the highly successful event included carefully crafted pieces such as The Thorn Birds (a collection of chocolate birds studded with chocolate thorns) and more conceptual entries such as The Life of Pi (a plastic tiger and a meat pie), Dangerous Liaisons (baking powder and vinegar - displayed separately) and Gone With the Wind (an open tin of baked beans).

This year the judges, writer and columnist Joe Bennett, The Press Zest editor Kate Fraser and a CPIT representative, will again be looking for the funniest, most delectable and most imaginative entries. The public also get to vote on a People’s Choice Award.

“The library decided to hold the International Edible Book Festival again as it was a great deal of fun last year. It is a great opportunity to work closely with our colleagues at Food and Hospitality and host an event that is open to students and staff across all of CPIT,” Julie Humby, CPIT Art Curator and Library Promotions, said.



After judging, the Edible Books will indeed be devoured. Winners will be announced at 12.15pm.

The International Edible Book Festival is held on 1 April for two reasons according to the event’s founders Judith A. Hoffberg and Béatrice Coron. Firstly, it is the birthday of French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), famous for his witty meditation on food, Physiologie du goût. And secondly, it’s April Fools' Day – a time of pranks and playfulness. The event is now held in at least 23 countries.

Ends

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