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Maori Health Summit Looks To The Future

Maori Health Summit Looks To The Future


The Toitū Hauora Māori Summit 2014 hosted by national Māori health workforce development organisation, Te Rau Matatini, will take place on Thursday 27 and Friday 28 March 2014 in Wellington.

The Toitū Hauora Māori Summit is a biennial, two-day hui for current and emerging Māori health leaders to engage with Māori leaders from other sectors and disciplines to build knowledge, skills and competencies to grow leadership and improve Māori health. Over 100 participants are expected to attend the 2014 Summit, including kaumatua and rangatahi who are involved in the Māori health, addictions and disability sectors.

The Honourable Tāriana Turia, Minister for Whānau Ora will open the Summit on Thursday [27 March 2014]. Other keynote speakers include respected Māori leaders in health, education and the arts - Professor Sir Mason Durie, Dr Cindy Kiro, Hana O’Regan and Mark Kopua.

The theme of this year’s Summit is Mauri Oho – our vibrant life force that flourishes. Questions underpinning the Summit are: what should Hauora Māori look like in 2030 and what are the key factors that will lead to gains in Māori health? These questions will be explored through workshops and panel discussions on a range of topics including Toi Māori, the use of Ta Moko in therapy, the impact of technology on Hauora Māori, and use of new interactive media in telling our stories.

“Toitu Hauora Māori Summit provides an opportunity for Māori leaders working in health to network, learn from and teach each other,” says Trish Davis, CEO Te Rau Matatini.

“Most importantly, it is about working together to plan for the future health and wellbeing of Māori. This is why we include rangatahi because it is important to hear and understand their perspectives. The Summit brings many threads together in one place so that we can all benefit from the expertise, experiences and inspiration that will nurture a better future for Hauora Maori.”

A highlight of the Summit will be the launch of a DVD aimed at rangatahi called “Kia Ora Ai Te Mauri o Te Tangata”. Produced by Paula Mauri-Mokomoko, a recipient of the 2013 Bob Henare Award (part of the Tohu Hiranga Awards presented by the Henry Rongomau Bennett Foundation), it tells the stories of two young women who have overcome their addictions and taken positive steps towards wellness and a drug-free life. It is designed as a resource and inspirational tool for rangatahi facing similar issues.

The Tohu Hiranga Awards 2014 will also be presented during the Summit in association with the Henry Rongomau Bennett Foundation. These will be awarded to recipients working in the mental health and addictions sectors who have demonstrated excellence and innovation in Māori health.

Another feature of discussion at the 2014 Summit will be the National Suicide Prevention Programme for Māori and Pacific Communities – Waka Hourua. Launched in February, the programme is aimed at supporting Māori and Pacific communities to develop and enhance their own capacity and capability to prevent suicide and to respond safely and effectively when and if suicide occurs.

The programme’s Strategic Research Agenda, Te Ra o Te Waka Hourua, has been developed by Te Rau Matatini and Le Va in consultation with the Health Research Council. It outlines the principles and priorities to build an evidence base around Māori and Pacific suicide prevention.

In addition, a one-off Community Fund is now open for Māori whānau, hapū and iwi, Pacific families and community groups to design and implement suicide prevention initiatives within their own communities. Applications for the second round of the Community Fund open on 1 April 2014. Assessment and granting of funds to successful applicants is expected to be made prior to 30 June 2014.

For a detailed programme of Toitū Hauora Māori Summit being held 27 and 28 March 2014 in Wellington visit the Te Rau Matatini website - www.matatini.co.nz


Ends.

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