Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Hector’s dolphins looking for WWII underwater mines

Hector’s dolphins looking for WWII underwater mines


Leading New Zealand tourism operator Black Cat Cruises is working with the New Zealand Navy who are training Hector’s dolphins to look for old World War II underwater mines off the Canterbury coast.

A spokesperson for the navy said that Hector’s dolphins were highly intelligent and were proving very easy to train to locate potentially dangerous underwater mines left over from World War II.

“The US Navy has been working with dolphins since the late 1950's,” he said. “Research was geared towards analysing the dolphin’s hydrodynamics and sonar and the US Navy carried out a wide variety of experiments to determine whether dolphins could be trained to locate and retrieve ‘lost’ objects from the seabed using its sonar. They were successful in using dolphins to replace expensive electronic equipment and human divers and things have evolved since then.”

The New Zealand Navy is conscious that a number of underwater mines may potentially still be on the sea floor off the coast of Canterbury, having been laid there at the height of tensions in World War II.

After contacted the US Navy and exploring options regarding their work with dolphins the NZ Navy decided training local Hector’s dolphins was the best, most cost effective solution to look for the dangerous mines.

Black Cat Cruises Managing Director Paul Bingham said his company was ‘very excited’ to be working with the New Zealand Navy on what he called a ‘ground breaking project.’

It’s a proven fact that dolphins possess intelligence second only to man's and they have the ability to learn tasks quickly and efficiently,” he said.

“Our local Hector’s dolphins have done us proud. They have picked things up way faster than expected and a number of mines have already been found.”

Bingham said the navy had access to Black Cat Cruises vessels, staff and knowledge of the local area and its research on Hector’s dolphins.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Super Rugby: Parade To Celebrate Highlanders’ Win

The Dunedin City Council is urging people to come along on Monday to congratulate the team on its win in Wellington tonight. The Highlanders will leave from outside the Dental School at midday. More>>

ALSO:

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news