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Cuba Art Quarter

Cuba Art Quarter

Late Night Open to 8pm
First Thursday of every month

Engage yourself in an amazing range of contemporary art this Thursday for the Cuba Art Quarter when seven galleries extend their opening hours until 8pm. Explore featured exhibitions and gallery stock rooms within a 100 metre radius from the corner of Cuba and Ghuznee Streets. You won’t need your walking shoes to cover this territory!

The Cuba Art Quarter occurs on the first Thursday of every month, inviting you to immerse yourself in this circuit of galleries surrounding Wellington’s ‘bohemian district’. Featuring this month:

Starting your walk on Ghuznee Street, Bartley and Company will be showing a new body of work by one of New Zealand’s most accomplished sculptors, Brett Graham. Just around the corner, right on Cuba, pop into the Peter McLeavey Gallery to catch the last days of photographer Yvonne Todd’s exhibition. Downstairs, Enjoy Public Art Gallery has an installation by Wellington artist Tom Mackie, which engages us with the gallery as ready-made, considering transient lighting effects, colour, and space. Then journey to the top of the building to catch the opening (start 5:30pm) of Douglas Stichbury’s ‘The Practice of Leisure’ at {Suite} Gallery. Taking a right down the other side of Ghuznee Street, Bowen Galleries will be showing the work of two distinguished artists; Jeff Thomson, known for his recycled iron and steel works and public installations, and photographer Peter Hannken. Just next door and up a quick flight of stairs is Isobel Thom’s “Jugs, teapots, cups, plates, rocket stoves and planters” at Hamish McKay Gallery. Finish your stroll through the bustle of Cuba Mall, down Left Bank to Robert Heald Gallery, where Michael Harrison will be opening an exhibition of new work. We look forward to seeing you there!

ENDS

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