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New Māori programmes bring variety to our screens

New Māori programmes bring a landmark documentary and variety to our screens

Both light entertainment and examination of a significant historic event will be covered in new programmes funded by NZ On Air under its Māori programming strategy, Te Rautaki Māori.

Hikoi, a one-hour one-off documentary will focus on the 1975 Land March. It will retrace the steps of the original marchers, speak to living participants and use archival footage of the actual march. Made by Scottie Douglas Productions, it will screen on TV One.

NZ On Air has also agreed to support a new variety show featuring a wide spectrum of Māori entertainment hosted by Temuera Morrison.

Happy Hour, featuring a mix of music and comedy, will screen on TV One and be recorded in front of a live studio audience. The show promises to be in the tradition of some of our most loved Māori entertainers, with the multi-talented Temuera following in his uncle Howard’s footsteps.

“We look forward to seeing the revival of the variety format in Happy Hour. It will aim for broad appeal, with laughs and song. And the documentary Hikoi will be an important documentary which will examine and re-tell this significant piece of our history for a new generation,” said NZ On Air Chief Executive Jane Wrightson.

Ends

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