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Celebrating over 400,000 Arts Centre Visitors!

Celebrating over 400,000 Arts Centre Visitors!


The James Wallace Arts Trust is celebrating a major milestone – over 400,000 visitors to the Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre since it opened.

The Pah Homestead opened to the public in August 2010 after an extensive restoration project undertaken by Auckland Council. The unique combination of the beautifully restored heritage

building, frequently changing high quality exhibitions, a café operated by award-winning Dawsons Catering and the tranquil park setting has made it a desirable destination for thousands of New Zealanders far and wide including primary, secondary and tertiary schools, recreational groups and arts enthusiasts, as well as international tourists. It has also proven to be a popular option for private, corporate events including weddings and charity fundraisers.

Operated by the James Wallace Arts Trust, the Arts Centre hosts an energetic and diverse programme of exhibitions of contemporary art curated from the Trust’s Collection of over 6,500 works of contemporary New Zealand art, as well as group and solo exhibitions by New Zealand artists, and regional and international touring exhibitions. To date the Trust has delivered over 100 exhibitions at the Arts Centre with many more scheduled for 2014 and beyond. The exhibition programme is complimented by a busy calendar of public programmes including tours, exhibition openings, artist talks, concerts, literary readings and educational workshops.

Visitors frequently express their delight at discovering such a valuable and unique resource in the Hillsborough area. The Pah Homestead is often referred to as a ‘hidden gem’ due to its inconspicuous location in the expansive Monte Cecilia Park. It is surrounded by spectacular specimens of mature exotic trees, some of which pre-date the Homestead which was built 1877-1879 for wealthy Auckland businessman James Williamson. Owned by the Auckland Catholic

Diocese and the Sisters of Mercy Order between 1913 and 2000, and used for a number of purposes including as an orphanage, various educational facilities and emergency housing, the Homestead has had a colourful past.

The latest edition of Lonely Planet New Zealand rates the TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre as number three in the ‘What’s New’ section across the whole country, and in the top ten Auckland sights.

The James Wallace Arts Trust is celebrating a major milestone – over 400,000 visitors to the Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre since it opened.

The Pah Homestead opened to the public in August 2010 after an extensive restoration project undertaken by Auckland Council. The unique combination of the beautifully restored heritage building, frequently changing high quality exhibitions, a café operated by award-winning Dawsons

Catering and the tranquil park setting has made it a desirable destination for thousands of New Zealanders far and wide including primary, secondary and tertiary schools, recreational groups and arts enthusiasts, as well as international tourists. It has also proven to be a popular option for private, corporate events including weddings and charity fundraisers.

Operated by the James Wallace Arts Trust, the Arts Centre hosts an energetic and diverse programme of exhibitions of contemporary art curated from the Trust’s Collection of over 6,500 works of contemporary New Zealand art, as well as group and solo exhibitions by New Zealand artists, and regional and international touring exhibitions. To date the Trust has delivered over 100 exhibitions at the Arts Centre with many more scheduled for 2014 and beyond. The exhibition programme is complimented by a busy calendar of public programmes including tours, exhibition openings, artist talks, concerts, literary readings and educational workshops.

Visitors frequently express their delight at discovering such a valuable and unique resource in the Hillsborough area. The Pah Homestead is often referred to as a ‘hidden gem’ due to its inconspicuous location in the expansive Monte Cecilia Park. It is surrounded by spectacular

specimens of mature exotic trees, some of which pre-date the Homestead which was built 1877-1879 for wealthy Auckland businessman James Williamson. Owned by the Auckland Catholic Diocese and the Sisters of Mercy Order between 1913 and 2000, and used for a number of purposes including as an orphanage, various educational facilities and emergency housing, the Homestead has had a colourful past.

The latest edition of Lonely Planet New Zealand rates the TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre as number three in the ‘What’s New’ section across the whole country, and in the top ten Auckland sights.

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