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Night Market takes a winter break

4 April 2014

Night Market takes a winter break

The Hastings City Night Market is taking a break this winter after a busy six months of bringing local food, produce, craft, and live entertainment to the people of Hawkes Bay. The final Night Market will take place on Thursday 1 May and will go out with a bang with a circus themed event.

Hastings City Business Association Manager and Night Market Organiser Susan McDade encourages people to experience one of the final four markets before they close for winter.

“The Night Market in the Hastings CBD has such a vibrant atmosphere, it’s a great place to bring the whole family to shop, eat and enjoy the live music and entertainment. Highlights over the next few weeks include the Easter themed Market on 17 April which will feature an Easter egg hunt, and the final circus themed market on 1 May showcasing a range of talented performers”, she says.

While the market will be in hibernation mode for winter, it will resurface with one big mid-winter, Matariki themed event scheduled for Thursday 26 June. Then after a well-deserved rest the Hastings City Night Market will return in the spring (along with Daylight Savings and the warmer weather) on Thursday 2 October.

McDade explains, “While the market was originally going to continue throughout the winter months, we decided that it is best to rest the weekly event for a few of the colder months this year, then to build it into an even bigger and better year round market in the spring”.

The Night Market has already drawn thousands of people into the city over the past six months, and has completely transformed the feel within the CBD on Thursday evenings. “We have had many comments from visitors about how the market has a ‘feel-good’ vibe to it, and how great it is to be able to take the whole family to a mid-week event and feel safe and secure – which is also a huge credit to the local City Assist team”, says McDade.

“We have our regulars who come every week to shop, eat and dance the night away to the live music, and we also have new visitors each time too – both locals and tourists alike. We have showcased a range of local bands and musicians, performers and local sports teams, and we’ve had many local charities and non-profit organisations fundraising in our community tents” she explains.

Many of the local retailers and restaurants are enjoying the influx of people into the city, with many offering special deals for the late night shoppers. Every week market organisers also receive new applications from local producers who want to ‘test the waters’ at the Night Market to see if their products are suitable before setting up a ‘bricks and mortar’ business in the city.

“We couldn’t be happier with how well the Night Market has been embraced by the community. Now we just need to have a bit of a rest to do some planning and preparation to make it even better”, says McDade.

The final four Night Markets will be held in the usual location in the CBD mall on Heretaunga Street West, by the clock tower and fountain from 5-9pm on Thursdays 10, 17 and 24 April, and 1 May.

ENDS

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