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Announcement: NZ Museum Awards 2014 – WINNERS


Announcement: NZ Museum Awards 2014 – WINNERS

EMBARGOED UNTIL 10PM, THURSDAY 3 APRIL 2014

Hawke's Bay Museum Awards winners

Hawke's Bay both hosted and won this year's NZ Museum Awards. Guests packed the Ballroom at Napier's War Memorial Centre on Thursday 3 April to celebrate the best of the best of museum and gallery projects from around the country, including two local winners.

MTG Hawke's Bay, the redeveloped museum, theatre and gallery complex deservedly won the museum project category for seamlessly connecting its old, not-so-old and new wings into a commanding new presence in the cultural life of Napier, which can now give due attention to its venerable collection.

Across the Bay, Hastings City Art Gallery won the new category for innovation in the use of Te Reo Maori. In Te Taniwha, the judges recognised that HCAG had utilised Te Reo Māori in a significant and meaningful way that captures and enhances the spiritual essence of the language and the historical, cultural and spiritual value of the stories, places and people.

Two other winners were collaborative projects. Rotorua Museum worked with DOC on the urban release of the NZ Falcon – a worthwhile and fun project for a museum
and its community. The judges were impressed by "the on-going 'falcon-ness' which is pervading Rotorua".

NZ Historic Places Trust worked with the NZ Film Archive to bring some unusual settings to life with historic film footage. Screening in listed woolsheds, Reel Life in Rural New Zealand won the public programmes category by "capturing a strong feeling of nostalgia and authenticity", and playing an active part in those rural communities.

The exhibition categories drew some especially strong entries, and the judges had a difficult task selecting the 6 finalists. The two winners were Tauranga Art Gallery for Corrugations: the art of Jeff Thompson, and Canterbury Museum for RISE – Street Art. The judges were impressed by Corrugations in the under $20k category. It is an "ambitious undertaking for the small team in a regional gallery", beautifully presented and with comprehensive public programme material and collateral, and currently touring other regions.

In the over $20k exhibition category, RISE – Street Art stood out for its creativity, vigour and rigour, "a conceptual and practical challenge handled professionally and bravely", said the judges.

Also honoured on the night was Bronwyn Simes, winner of the Individual Achievement Award. Bronwyn is respected and appreciated by all her colleagues for her dedicated contribution as a project manager, most recently shepherding the redevelopment of Toitu Otago Settlers Museum, and now helping Canterbury Museum with their earthquake recovery.

"Once again, the annual Museum Awards showcase the amazingly innovative and ambitious projects and exhibitions created by our museums and galleries. With so many entries this year, the standard of the finalists and winners is very high. We're especially grateful to our judging panel – I'm glad I didn’t have to make those difficult decisions”, said Phillipa Tocker, Executive Director of Museums Aotearoa. "Congratulations too all who entered, it makes me proud to be part of our vibrant and creative sector."

The Awards celebration was part of Museums Aotearoa's MA14 conference, The Business of Culture. The awards programme is grateful for sponsorship from ServiceIQ, National Services Te Paerangi, Philips Selecon, Huia Publishing and Clearview Estate winery.

ENDS


full list of finalists/winners follows

MA14 conference programme, keynotes and events at
http://www.museumsaotearoa.org.nz/ma14-business-culture


New Zealand Museum Awards 2014 Winners and Finalists

Best Exhibition over $20,000WINNER
Canterbury Museum, RISE - Street Art
FINALIST
Auckland War Memorial Museum, Moana - My Ocean
FINALIST
Christchurch Art Gallery, Burster Flipper Wobbler Dripper Spinner Stacker Shaker Maker
Best Exhibition under $20,000WINNER
Tauranga Art Gallery, Corrugations: the art of Jeff Thomson
FINALIST
Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Sir Frank Brangwyn: Captain Winterbottom and the Billiard Room of Horton House
FINALIST
Te Awamutu Museum, Toi Ki Roto - Art inside from the Te Ao Marama Unit, Waikeria Prison
Best Museum Project
(activity)
WINNER
Rotorua Museum, On the Wing - Urban Release of the New Zealand Falcon
FINALIST
New Zealand Historic Places Trust, High Street Stories www.highstreetstories.co.nz
FINALIST
Te Hikoi, Taonga Toki Project
Best Museum Project
(museum)
WINNER
MTG Hawke's Bay, MTG Hawke's Bay Redevelopment Project
FINALIST
Canterbury Museum, Quake City
FINALIST
Whakatane Museum, Te Kōputu a Te Whanga a Toi development
Most Innovative Public ProgrammeWINNER
New Zealand Historic Places Trust and New Zealand Film Archive
Reel Life in Rural New Zealand
FINALIST
Canterbury Museum, Red Zone Bus Tours
FINALIST
Museums Wellington, Great Strike 1913
FINALIST
Voyager NZ Maritime Museum, Auckland Tall Ships Festival
Most Innovative use of Te Reo Māori WINNER
Hastings City Art Gallery, Te Taniwha
FINALIST
MTG Hawke's Bay, Ūkaipō - ō tātou whakapapa, Taonga Māori exhibition
FINALIST
Voyager NZ Maritime Museum, Kōrero Tipua
Individual Achievement WINNER
Bronwyn Simes

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