Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


NZ Tyre Awareness Week

First NZ Tyre Awareness Week wants drivers to put their wheels to the test

Getting more New Zealanders to check their tyres is the focus of New Zealand’s first ever Tyre Awareness Week from April 7-13.

Tyres are the only source of contact between your car and the road. They’re vitally important to a car’s safety and fuel economy, but many drivers check them rarely – if at all. This is why a range of government agencies, motoring industry businesses and the AA have joined together for Tyre Awareness Week.

The focus of the week will be encouraging drivers to regularly:

• Check the depth of tread and condition of their tyres

• Make sure their tyres are at the correct air pressure

“It only takes a few minutes once a month to check your tread depth and air pressure,” says AA Motoring Advice Manager Andrew Bayliss.

“www.tyresafety.org.nz shows the simple checks every driver should be doing to keep them and their whanau safe. Tyres are the only contact between a vehicle and the road.”

Tyres without much tread left or that are underinflated will have less grip on the road and take longer to stop in wet conditions.

Transport Agency Road Safety Director Ernst Zollner says the agency is supporting tyre awareness week as part of a long-term effort to encourage drivers to make sure their vehicles are safe for every journey.

“Properly inflated tyres with good tread depth are a ‘must have’ for your vehicle to be safe. No driver is perfect, and safe tyres can help prevent small mistakes from resulting in serious crashes. We all need to step up and take a more active role in keeping our vehicles safe,” says Mr Zollner.

Keeping your tyres at the correct tyre pressure is also vital for safety - and it extends the life of your tyres and improves fuel economy, too.

“Under-inflation increases rolling resistance, meaning that more fuel is needed to turn your wheels”, says Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority Transport Manager Joern Scherzer.

“A monthly top-up of air could mean savings of 4% - that’s like saving 8c a litre at current petrol prices. If everyone in New Zealand kept their tyres correctly pumped, New Zealand would save enough fuel to fill 1,500 petrol tankers – and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by almost 70,000 tonnes.”

Drivers are responsible for maintaining their vehicle in a roadworthy condition at all times, including checking their tyres to ensure they haven’t worn out the tread, lost air pressure or been damaged.

“We see cars with bald tyres, tyres with objects sticking out of them or tyres that are significantly underinflated,” says Bill Prebble, the Technical and Product Manager for Goodyear & Dunlop Tyres (NZ).

“Some drivers have been driving with no idea that their tyres were at risk of significantly increased stopping distances in the wet, or even suddenly deflating. If people think there could be any issues with their tyres they should get them checked by a tyre professional straight away.”

For information on how to check your tyres or to go in the draw for several sets of new tyres being given away for Tyre Awareness Week people can go to www.tyresafety.org.nz

Ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news