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New Orleans comes to the Village

New Orleans comes to the Village

On Sunday 20 and Monday 21 April, the Historic Village becomes the Jazz Village at it transforms into a slice of the New Orleans French Quarter for two great days of family-friendly fun.

From the intimate setting of the Layafette Church to outstanding outdoor jazz on the Pacific Toyota stage, more than twenty bands and performers provide hours of entertainment over the two days.

On Sunday and Monday enthusiasts can catch Auckland’s foremost jazz organ trio, The Alan Brown Trio, as they perform an afternoon of Hammond-funk, swing, and good time grooves in the House of Hammond.

The future of jazz is on show in the New Orleans Music Factory on Sunday. Featuring students as young as eight, the Jazz Stars of Tomorrow showcases the amazing talent of our Baby Jazz, Young Guns of the Blues and Youth Jazz competitors.

The entertainment opens on Sunday with the Frank Gibson Quartet, as they celebrate 60 years of music since Frank first stepped on stage as an eight year old.

All the way from Germany, progressive blues and jazzrock unit Solid Brew unit highlights on Monday afternoon. With their groove explosions and thrilling improvisations, this three-piece play a wide-variety of expressive and well rounded songs that keep the party swinging.

Blues scene mainstay Mike Garner and NZ’s foremost harp player, Neil Billington, master of both the diatonic and chromatic harmonicas, wrap up the weekend’s entertainment on to the outdoor stage on Monday.

“The Jazz Village is a great family outing– from Nana to the grandkids, there is something for every one this Easter,” says Festival Director Becks Chambers. “We really encourage people to come down for the whole day, take time to meander between the stages, check out the markets and kidzone, and enjoy a relaxed family day out”.

With strolling bands, food vendors, the Bay of Plenty Times community market, and a Kidzone, there is plenty on offer for all the family. Entry is $10 for adults and free for
strolling bands, food and art stalls and activities for the children and entry is $10 for children under 14. TECT cardholders are free on Sunday.

For the full band lineup visit www.jazz.org.nz

Catch a Bus for Free this Easter!
If you’re after a no-fuss way to travel to and from the Jazz Festival this Easter Weekend, then why not go by bus – for free! On Saturday and Sunday (19 and 20 April), Bay of Plenty Regional Council is providing free buses, at an increased frequency of service, on all Tauranga urban routes. For full route information, visit www.baybus.co.nz or call 0800 4BAYBUS (0800 422928).

ENDS

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