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Top Artist Derek Lardelli heading to British Columbia

8 April 2014

Derek Lardelli involved in an exchange programme with the Freda Diesing Northwest Coast School of Indigenous Art, Terrace BC, Canada

Derek Lardelli, Board Member of Toi Māori and Chair for his national art form team Te Uhi a Mataora, is regarded as one of Aotearoa, New Zealand's finest tā moko artists. For a long time, Derek has been prominent in explaining the revival of the art and its spiritual significance to audiences throughout the country and the Pacific.

Each moko he creates is carefully researched to reflect the whakapapa, history and particular interests of the person receiving it. Although he uses modern electrical equipment his work reflects the deep respect he holds for the traditions of his ancestors.

Derek's work as a practising ta moko artist is only one of many roles that he fulfils as a visual artist, carver, and kapa haka performer, composer, and graphic designer, researcher of whakapapa, tribal history, and whaikōrero. Derek is also a Kapa Haka tutor for the Whangara Mai Tawhiti Cultural Group.

He will be sharing his experiences with friends of the Toi Māori network Stan Bevan, Principal Tutor of Freda Diesing School and Stan’s uncle, Dempsey Bob and their community based in Terrace British Columbia. He will also have the opportunity to exchange with the Emily Carr University in Vancouver.

Derek will depart on Good Friday and spend two weeks with the school and communities in Canada.

About Toi Māori Aotearoa
Toi Māori Aotearoa is a Charitable Trust set up by Māori Artists and is a national organisation for Māori art forms. It receives major funding from Creative New Zealand.

ENDS

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