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NZIFF Autumn Classic Movie Weekends

NZIFF Autumn Classic Movie Weekends


Astaire. Brando. Hepburn. Miyazaki. Welles.
NZIFF presents legends of the giant screen this Autumn.

NZIFF presents fabulous film events this autumn at MTG Hawke’s Bay. MTG is the only regional centre in New Zealand to be part of the Autumn Classic Movie Weekends curated by the New Zealand International Film Festival. The programme is also showing at The Civic in Auckland, Embassy in Wellington, Regent Dunedin, and Hoyts Riccarton in Christchurch.

From the curators of the New Zealand International Film Festival comes a weekend line-up of classic films made to be seen on the magnificent cinema screen.

Featuring:
The Third Man – Saturday 12th April at 6:00pm
The Wind Rises - Sunday 13th April at 6:30pm
On the Waterfront – Saturday 19th April at 6:00pm
Funny Face - Saturday 26th April at 2:15pm
Lawrence of Arabia – Sunday 27th April at 2:15pm

NZIFF Autumn Events in Napier will screen across three weekends at the MTG Century Theatre in April, starting on Saturday 12 April.

“Napier film goers love a festival and we are very pleased to be able to bring the NZIFF Autumn Classic Movie Weekends to the MTG Century Theatre this month” says Eloise Wallace Public Programmes Team Leader.

“Napier is the only place, outside of the four main centres where this programme will screening and the MTG Century Theatre’s fantastic new digital projection equipment makes for a classic film experience on the big screen like you’ve never seen before.”

Tickets can be purchased from the MTG Theatre Box Office. To purchase your tickets online or by telephone contact Ticketek 0800 TICKETEK (842 538). Please note service fees apply for ticket purchases made online and by phone.

Venue
MTG Century Theatre, 9 Herschell Street
Tickets
Adults: $16:00
Students/Film Society/Industry Guilds/MTG Friends: $14:00
Senior Citizens: $14:00
Children: $11:00
Five Trip Pass: $70:00

Ends

For more information please contact
Pam Joyce
Marketing Team Leader
p 06 833 9923
e pjoyce@mtghawkesbay.com

Films screening in NZIFF Autumn Events 2014 at MTG Century Theatre:

Funny Face
USA 1957
Director: Stanley Donen
Saturday 26 April, 2.15 pm

A charming confection of 50s vogues, this musical casts Audrey Hepburn as a brainy West Village bookshop manager and Fred Astaire as the fashion photographer whose camera (not to mention a trip to Paris and some fabulous Givenchy gowns) might just transform her into a runway star.
“The musical that dares to rhyme Sartre with Montmartre, Funny Face knocks most other musicals off the screen for its visual beauty, its witty panache, and it’s totally uncalculating charm.”— Time Out Film Guide
URL http://www.nziff.co.nz/autumn-events/film/funny-face

Lawrence of Arabia
UK/USA 1962
Director: David Lean
Festivals: Cannes (Classics), London 2012
Sunday 27 April, 2.15 pm

David Lean’s 1962 biopic remains the benchmark in epic action cinema: literate, dynamic and visually stupendous. Dashing performances by Peter O’Toole and Omar Sharif defined the two young actors for life.
“There are no intelligent epics like this today and, because of computer-generated effects, it's unlikely that there ever will be again.” — Philip French, The Observer
URL http://www.nziff.co.nz/autumn-events/film/lawrence-of-arabia

On The Waterfront
USA 1954
Director: Elia Kazan
Winner, Eight Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor
Saturday 19 April, 6.00 pm

Marlon Brando mesmerises in the indelible performance that revolutionised big-screen acting 60 years ago and is still heart-breaking today.
“As unspoiled in its key elements as the day it was made, On the Waterfront is indisputably one of the great American films.” — Kenneth Turan, LA Times
URL http://www.nziff.co.nz/autumn-events/film/on-the-waterfront

The Third Man
UK 1949
Director/Producer: Carol Reed
Saturday 12 April, 6.00 pm

Ranked first in the British Film Institute’s end-of-century survey of British cinema, The Third Man is film noir with rare pedigree: director Carol Reed and actor Orson Welles bring sinister flamboyance to novelist Graham Greene’s literate, perfectly structured thriller script.
“Of all the movies I have seen, this one most completely embodies the romance of going to the movies.” — Roger Ebert
URL http://www.nziff.co.nz/autumn-events/film/the-third-man

The Wind Rises
Kaze tachinu, Japan 2013
Director: Miyazaki Hayao
In Japanese, French, German and Italian, with English subtitles
Nominated, Best Animated Feature, Academy Awards 2014
Sunday 13 April, 6.00 pm, Subtitled Version

The great Japanese animator Miyazaki Hayao has announced his retirement and if he sticks to his word, he will have gone out on a sublime note. The Wind Rises is a fictionalised portrait of the brilliant aeronautical engineer Horikoshi Jiro and the two loves of his life: his work, and his ailing wife, Nahoko.
“Marked by flights of incredible visual fancy… Miyazaki’s hauntingly beautiful historical epic draws a sober portrait of Japan between the two World Wars.” — Scott Foundas, Variety
URL http://www.nziff.co.nz/autumn-events/film/the-wind-rises-dub
URL http://www.nziff.co.nz/autumn-events/film/the-wind-rises

Ends

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