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Time Change For Billy Connolly Tour

Time Change For Billy Connolly Tour


All venues

Start time NOW 8pm and not 7.30pm

Thre is a new start time at all venues for Billy Connolly’s current tour of New Zealand.

It’s 8pm and not 7.30pm as previously advertised.

Operational and travel plans have obliged the promoters to take the unusual step of starting his show 30 minutes later than originally planned.

Billy’s tour kicked off in Napier last night to a capacity audience. Fans were last seen in fits of laughter. A full house tonight can expect more of the same!
He’s funnier than ever and he’s riding a very high horse, his head filled with the humour that’s built up since the last visit.

Being Billy

His professional life started in the shipyards of Glasgow where he worked as a welder in the early 60s. He decided to give it away to pursue a career as a folk singer and banjo player in the Humblebums with Gerry Rafferty (later of Baker Street fame) and then as soloist.

The jokes he told between songs eventually took over his act and he became a full-time comedian. Already a big star in Scotland, he became a household name in the UK after appearing on "Parkinson" (1971) in the early 70s.

He also became an actor, and has appeared in blockbusters ranging from Indecent Proposal (1993) to Mrs. Brown (1997), for which he was nominated for a BAFTA; the all-star Quartet (2012) through to Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) and Gulliver’s Travels (2010) starring Jack Black, to name but a few. His love affair with New Zealand has included appearances in Peter Jackson’s Hobbit movies as well as The Last Samurai, filmed in Taranaki, and starring Tom Cruise.

A worldwide TV audience of over 30 million also got to see him hooning around on his trike and naked bungy jumping for his series World Tour of New Zealand (2004).


In 2012, BILLY CONNOLLY's artistic expression took a new path, in the form of fine art (his tour logo features his own art). The process is similar to that of the Surrealist Automatism movement, whereby the artist allows the hand to move randomly across the paper or canvas, without an intent to create anything specifically.

Connolly's art can also be likened to that of the cave paintings that originated in Aurignacian culture, possessing a charming simplicity, yet an extraordinary self-awareness and humanity. Connolly's characters are faceless, completely anonymous; seemingly devoid of emotion or expression and yet, the emotional connection with the audience is quite prevalent.

Don’t miss out on seeing this great jockey of jokes on his high horse!
ends

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