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Lloyd Geering to end his lectureship career at the age of 96

Lloyd Geering to end his lectureship career at the age of 96

When he recently turned 96 years of age, Professor Lloyd Geering decided to retire from his role as Principal Lecturer of the St Andrew’s Trust for the Study of Religion and Society. His final talk in that capacity will be given during the week of the opening of the new St Andrew’s Centre on Tuesday 6 May, 2014 at St Andrew’s on The Terrace in Wellington.

“I am in good health and enjoying my tenth decade,” Professor Geering said.

“Through a long lifetime of publishing and lecturing, both within and outside of the St Andrew’s Trust, Professor Geering has offered a view of religion that appeals to mature and questing people as well as being vitally necessary in a world that is becoming more politically fractured and environmentally fragile,” said broadcaster and Trustee Noel Cheer.

“As the Trust’s Principal Lecturer, Professor Geering has delivered one or more series of lectures each year since 1984. Most of these lectures have an afterlife as booklets, CDs or DVDs,” Cheer said.

“While Professor Geering’s active involvement with the Trust will be greatly missed, it has been Wellington’s good fortune to have been the main location for these lectures. Rather than actively seeking one individual to step into Sir Lloyd’s shoes, the Trust will broaden its activities into different forms of lectureship.”

“His recent book, From The Big Bang to God: Our awe-inspiring journey of evolution, extends a publishing career which was launched in 1968 with God In The New World.”

Professor Geering was appointed the foundation Professor of Religious Studies at Victoria University of Wellington in 1971 and, more recently, has been involved in Biblical research in the company of scholars from the Westar Institute in the United States. In 2007, Professor Geering was admitted to the Order of New Zealand and two years later elevated to Knight Grand Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

St Andrew’s Trust for the Study of Religion and Society was incorporated in 1984 as a charitable trust to establish a study and lectureship centre in Wellington. For more than three decades, the Trust has provided learning opportunities for people in Wellington and beyond to engage in critiquing and valuing developments in religion, spirituality, arts and sciences during changing economic and political times.

Ends

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