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‘Mind the Gap’ Doco Wins Gold at New York Festivals

9 April, 2014

‘Mind the Gap’ Doco Wins Gold at New York Festivals

Bryan Bruce’s documentary Mind the Gap has won a Gold Medal at this year’s New York Festivals International Television & Film Awards, announced in Las Vegas a few hours ago.

"It's a great honour," says Bruce. "This is a very tough competition where you're up against the world's best from over 50 countries. At the same time there's more than a touch of irony in winning Gold on the international stage with a topic about which New Zealanders should feel deeply ashamed."

MediaWorks TV Head of Commissioning, Sue Woodfield congratulated Bruce on his well-deserved win. “Bryan’s documentaries address important questions, challenging us to do what we can as individuals and a community to make life better for all. They are must-see television.”

Mind the Gap is produced by Red Sky Film & Television for TV3, with support from NZ On Air. It investigates the growing gap between rich and poor in New Zealand, revealing why inequality is bad (even for the rich) and what we can do about it. It is the second in a series by the award-winning documentary maker for TV3. The first, Inside Child Poverty, triggered a nationwide debate on the plight of our poorest children when it was broadcast on TV3 in 2011.

"The New Zealand I grew up in celebrated fairness and equal opportunity,” says Bruce. “It was a society in which a boy from a state house could grow up to be the Prime Minister. Now 10% of New Zealanders own 52% of the wealth in our country, while at the other end of the socio-economic scale mums and dads are working all week and can't make ends meet. That's not fair. It's not what I believe we stand for as a people and a nation.”

"Getting a Gold Medal is wonderful, but if Mind the Gap has played a part in focusing our attention on inequality and child poverty in an election year, that's the prize I, and the great team of film makers that helped me make our award-winning programme, will treasure most."

Mind the Gap is available to watch on the 3NOW App, and at TV3.co.nz/3NOW.

It can also be purchased at The Film Shop, with all profits going to supporting the Breakfast Club at Russell School Porirua). http://filmshop.co.nz/products-page/directors/bryan-bruce/mind-the-gap/

Visit www.bryanbruce.co.nz for details and for more information on the social issues facing New Zealand.

ENDS

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