Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Exhibition Celebrates Power of Arts

Exhibition Celebrates Power of Arts

The power of the arts to change lives is being celebrated in a photo exhibition.

The exhibition is held at the Albert-Eden local board office on Dominion Rd until 9 May. It comprises images drawn from The Auckland Dance Project, an annual event led by Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra (APO) with artistic direction from leading dance professionals including Atamira Dance Company’s Moss Patterson. The project features young people who rehearse for up to six months before giving a performance to a paying audience with the APO providing live music.

So far the Auckland Dance Project has featured nearly 400 dancers, drawn from north, south, east, west and central Auckland, encompassing schools from decile one to 10. Several of those participants have gone on to study dance or performing arts at tertiary level.

The images were taken by leading photojournalist Adrian Malloch, who has followed the Auckland Dance Project since its 2011 beginning. “At heart I am a documentary photographer, so I try to tell stories with my images,” Mr Malloch says. “Being able to follow this over time has been a wonderful opportunity to create a body of work that will have increasing meaning and resonance.”

Like the Auckland Dance Project itself, the photographic exhibition is collaborative, and is part of an ongoing series hosted at the Albert-Eden local board office, celebrating local artists and arts organisations and facilitated by Auckland Council’s Community Development Arts and Culture team. The exhibition has been curated by Raewyn Whyte and Dr Linda Ashley.

“The photographs capture exceptional moments of excitement, learning and achievement, when music and dance combine to transform an ordinary experience into something extraordinary,” says Dr Ashley.

APO Chief Executive Barbara Glaser agrees, and believes the greatest value of the Auckland Dance Project lies in what it contributes beyond the worlds of music and dance. “What’s even more important is that participants develop life skills they will carry for ever, and catch a glimpse of something inspiring that lies outside their experience or imagination. That is the power of the arts.”

WHAT: The Auckland Dance Project: Selected Images 2011-2013
WHERE: Albert-Eden Local Board Office, 135 Dominion Rd, Mt Eden
WHEN: Monday to Friday, 8.30am-5pm, until Friday 9 May
COST: Free

Background
• There have been three dance projects: Sacre (2011), Fireworks (2012) and Takarangi (2013)
Sacre was choreographed by Berlin-based dance personality Royston Maldoom, Fireworks andTakarangi were choreographed by Moss Patterson.
• Schools and universities to have taken part include: Tangaroa College (2011, 2012, 2013), University of Auckland (2011, 2012), Pakuranga Intermediate (2011, 2012), Kristin School (2011), Mt Albert Grammar (2011), Hay Park Primary (2011), New Lynn Primary (2011), Wiri Central School (2012), Unitec (2013), Waitakere College (2013), Balmoral School (2013).
• The 2014 dance project, Te Manu Ahi, again features Moss Patterson as artistic director, and takes place at the Aotea Centre on 22 October.
• Adrian Malloch has made the images available to view on Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/827551163926620/

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news