Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Anzac day, every day

16 April 2014

Anzac day, every day

The old soldiers stand stiffly to attention as they salute the cenotaph, eyes fixed firmly ahead. The bugler begins The Last Post, that most mournful and familiar mark of respect. Not one stirs as he comes to his end, his bugle pushed down to his side. He waits. Then comes the echo – The Last Post, again, drifts hauntingly through the early morning mist on the paddock, forcing an even bigger lump into the throat of the old soldiers, the second bugler barely visible in the trees. And when his breath runs out there’s no dry eye.

This is Anzac Day and this is the way it has been, this and a thousand other forms in a thousand other places, for nearly 100 years. Nowadays, the difference is that there are fewer survivors of the many battles, now replaced by sons and daughters and their sons and daughters. And those who are left are tired and sitting, supported by sons and daughters and their sons and daughters.

But, really, nothing has changed, because Anzac Day remains the special, special day – a day for those who remain, or those who survived, to honour loved ones close to or never met, and comrades, who fell in battle and who fell after battle. It is this special day because as a nation we remember special people, and we grieve again for them. And that’s okay. Because in doing so we acknowledge the importance of being able to say goodbye.

It’s a goodbye that is replicated in scores of other forms in this country every day of the year. It’s a part of life. As funeral directors, we see every day just how important this process is. And that’s okay, too.

Lest we forget.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Francis Cook: Gallipoli: The Scale Of Our War – First Look

Te Papa today allowed media access to their new exhibition Gallipoli: The Scale of Our War . The exhibition was curated with help from Weta Workshop to deliver an immersive, realistic and even disorienting experience. More>>

ALSO:

Bats Theatre: Letters From The Front Brings ANZAC Letters Alive

Inspired by centenary commemorations, improv troupe Best on Tap is producing a show based on real-life letters sent to and from New Zealand soldiers in the First World War. More>>

ALSO:

Publishing: Unity Books On Plan To Close Te Papa Press

Unity Books is alarmed that Te Papa is proposing to suspend publishing by Te Papa Press for 4 or 5 years. Te Papa Press has proven time and time again that it has both award and bestseller capability and fulfils its kaupapa. More>>

ALSO:

Cinema: ‘The Desk’ Featuring Paul Henry To Have NZ Debut

The Documentary Edge Festival is thrilled to announce The Desk as a late entry to its 2015 Programme. The film, featuring local broadcaster Paul Henry, will have its international premiere on May 21 at 10pm at Q Theatre (book now at qtheatre.co.nz) with limited screenings also on offer in Wellington and Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Art: Considering Feminisms In Aotearoa New Zealand: Two Projects

Feminism is something that has changed our lives. Recently, the activist Marilyn Waring reviewed the impact of feminism in Aotearoa New Zealand and reminded us that just 40 years ago banks wouldn’t lend women money without the guarantee of a man, ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news