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Students create their own league to find legends

Students create their own league to find legends


Victoria University of Wellington will play host to an e-sport tournament over the holidays, with students both co-ordinating and competing in online games.

Organised by the Victoria Engineering Club (VEC), teams of students will play League of Legends which, with 27 million active players, is currently one of the most popular video games worldwide.

Through the support of Riot, the company behind the successful game, the winning Victoria team will go on to compete against other Oceania teams at the Oceanic Gaming Winter Arena in May.

After battling it out for two weeks from 21 April, the final on 2 May will be screened on campus for students to watch. VEC organiser, Kieran Carnegie says the entertainment of e-sports isn't just for those playing.

"Commentary of games is much the same as with sports, and it's something that's really blossomed within e-sport culture. So we're going to have students within the club commentating every game for those wanting to watch, and then some professionals for showing the final on campus," says Carnegie, a computer science Master’s student.

Victoria researcher Dr Yuri Seo from the School of Marketing and International Business at Victoria Business School says that as computer gaming has grown worldwide, a spectator element has developed, as is the case with any other professional sport.

"There are people who want to watch the game, and it becomes a form of performance. And because you have increased spectatorship, you then have companies which want to sponsor events, and they just grow from there," says Dr Seo.

According to Dr Seo, a lot of the industry is consumer driven, and the tournament at Victoria is a good example of how the industry is working in a variety of ways to engage with consumers.

"The thing with e-sports is that community is a really big thing, and plays a very important role. This means it's common to see companies try and engage with them, and leads to both large and small scale events."

Dr Seo says that although the local market is currently quite small, because it's youth and technology driven, people living in New Zealand can still be a part of the growing international e-sport culture.

Victoria's first big e-sport tournament is open to students of all abilities, and there are a number of prizes being offer to competitors by both Riot and the VEC.

"This isn't a tournament where we're expecting everyone to be amazing. Whether you've only played a little bit or a lot, get together with a couple of mates and have a lot of fun," says Kieran.

The VEC, which has grown to over 300 members this year, is open to all students interested in engineering, computer science, or technology in general. Along with e-sports, the club runs a number of events from LAN-parties to robot building competitions.

For more information or to register for the tournament, visit: www.facebook.com/VictoriaEngineeringClub

To find out more, contact Kieran Carnegie on 04-463 5233, extn 8286 or email kotarou@ecs.vuw.ac.nz or vuw.vec.esports@gmail.com

Ends


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