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Join National Geographic’s Amazing Adventurers at Live Shows

Join National Geographic’s Amazing Adventurers

Live Shows Announced For Auckland & Wellington

Coral, Fire, & Ice: Explore Secret Underwater Worlds with David Doubilet
Wellington | Thurs 7 August | Te Papa National Museum (Soundings Theatre)
Bookings: 0800 111999 | ticketmaster.co.nz
Auckland | Sat 9 August | Aotea Centre (ASB Theatre)
Bookings: 0800 111999 | ticketmaster.co.nz

Extreme Adventure on the Edge: Vertical Feats and the Man Who Can Fly – Bryan Smith

Auckland | Wed 1 October | Aotea Centre (ASB Theatre)
Bookings: 0800 111999 | ticketmaster.co.nz

Wellington | Thurs 2 October | Te Papa National Museum (Soundings Theatre)
Bookings: 0800 111999 | ticketmaster.co.nz

Behind every great National Geographic story there’s an explorer who travels to the wildest places above and below the earth to bring back epic tales of adventure and discovery.

Returning to New Zealand and presenting in Wellington for the first time, National Geographic Live presents two extraordinary adventurers to share their unbelievable stories in an audio visual feast that will have audiences at the edge of their seats.

Coral, Fire, & Ice sees legendary underwater photographer David Doubilet cast a spell of enchantment with the glittering beauty of the world’s “coral triangle’’ and the lure of sculptural icebergs and shipwrecks in the icy waters of Antarctica. In Extreme Adventure on the Edge, adventure filmmaker Bryan Smith shares gripping, behind-the-scenes moments from his assignments documenting extreme feats in the world’s most challenging environments.

Appealing to those inspired by travel, exploration, discovery – and who value the National Geographic Society’s mission to inspire people to care about the planet – National Geographic Liveis for adventurers, thinkers, nature lovers and explorers of all ages.

Coral, Fire, & Ice: Explore Secret Underwater Worlds with David Doubilet
“Kimbe Bay is a world more alien than the edges of space.”—David Doubilet

Photographer David Doubilet has spent five decades under the surface in the far corners of the world, including interior Africa, remote tropical coral reefs, rich temperate seas and recent projects in the northern and southern ice. He has photographed more than 70 stories for National Geographic reporting on coral reefs, historic shipwrecks, ocean predators, and exotic marine creatures.

David’s personal challenge is to create a visual voice for the world’s oceans and to connect people to the incredible beauty and silent devastation happening within the invisible world below.

In “Coral, Fire, and Ice,” he takes audiences across three continents. First , to the rich and diverse waters of Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, part of the “coral triangle” that is the centre of the world in terms of marine biodiversity. Then, journeying south to the cold ice filled waters of Antarctica, Doubilet moves through and under the ice to capture images of the hidden world of the leopard seal, penguins, shipwrecks and his newest work on the sculptural beauty of icebergs. Finally, his photographic journey takes audiences up north to Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence to capture an extraordinary world of whales, wolfish, salmon, and harp seals, a remarkable creature fighting to survive in a world of shrinking sea ice.

David Doubilet reveals never-before-seen images from his assignments and the reality of life behind the camera—from parasites to harp seal bites—as he shares his adventures working to get the best shot. The author of 12 titles including the award wining Water Light Time, David is the recipient of Picture of the Year, BBC Wildlife, Communication Arts and World Press awards as well as a member of the Academy of Achievement, International League of Conservation Photographers, International Diving Hall of Fame and a Trustee of the Shark Research Institute.

His images are prized for both their scientific value and their aesthetic beauty. He is endowed with a keen sense of humor and the ability to speak poetically about his subjects.

Extreme Adventure on the Edge:Vertical Feats and the Man Who Can Fly – Bryan Smith
“Extreme is whatever is scary for you.”— Bryan Smith

Join Bryan Smith, an award-winning filmmaker, adventurer and conservationist for the National Geographic Channel, as he shares gripping moments from his assignments to document extreme feats and high adventure in the world’s most challenging environments.

An experienced kayaker who had paddled steep rivers in India, Peru, and Russia, Smith was inspired to take up video photography while protesting a hydroelectric dam project that threatened British Columbian rivers. He quickly developed a knack for creating innovative technical solutions to capture dizzying images—inevitably putting himself and his team at risk to get the shot.

Braving raging whitewater in British Columbian rivers; sharing too little space with grizzlies in Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula (where legions of mosquitos are the other voracious predators to fear); and fulfilling the eternal dream of human flight are all situations and subjects that have absorbed Bryan Smith over the past ten years.

As opposed to being a thrill-seeker, Bryan Smith is a deeply creative, conservation-minded, and extraordinarily passionate storyteller who very consciously uses his filmmaking craft to elevate important stories that will invigorate and inspire us to probe our limitations, and entertain us in new ways.

About National Geographic Live
National Geographic Live is the live events division of the National Geographic Society, featuring live concerts, films and dynamic presentations by today's leading explorers, scientists, filmmakers and photographers, covering a wide range of topics including exploration and adventure, wildlife and habitat conservation, natural phenomena and relevant issues such as climate change. Proceeds from speaker series ticket sales help fund future National Geographic initiatives in field research, exploration and education. For more information, visit www.nglive.org

About National Geographic Society
The National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. Founded in 1888 to “increase and diffuse geographic knowledge,” the Society’s mission is to inspire people to care about the planet. It reaches more than 400 million people worldwide each month through its official journal, National Geographic, and other magazines; National Geographic Channel; television documentaries; music; radio; films; books; DVDs; maps; exhibitions; live events; school publishing programs; interactive media; and merchandise. National Geographic has funded more than 10,000 scientific research, conservation and exploration projects and supports an education program promoting geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com

ENDS

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