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Collaborative arts projects to mark 100 years since WW1


Image credit: I AM. Photo courtesy of MAU.

Media release: Collaborative arts projects to mark 100 years since World War 1

With this Anzac Day tomorrow marking 100 years since the beginning of the First World War, Creative New Zealand is proud to support a new arts fund focused on the effect of the Great War on our nation and its place in the world.

The first round of grants from Creative New Zealand’s First World War Centenary (WW100) Co-Commissioning Fund supports exciting new works by director/choreographer Lemi Ponifasio, composer Gareth Farr and the Ake Ake Theatre Company.

The fund targets national and international organisations to commission new, large-scale, collaborative work with New Zealand artists as part of the wider government programme to mark the First World War centenary (WW100). The Fund is unique in offering support for creative development (artist fees, rehearsal and material costs), with presentation costs covered by the other commissioning partners.

“We are honoured to support these very special and diverse arts projects which foster appreciation and remembrance of New Zealand’s contribution to the Great War,” says Cath Cardiff, Creative New Zealand’s Senior Manager, Arts Policy, Capability and International.

“This new fund also offers our artists an opportunity to create and present new work both nationally and internationally, to further develop their audiences, and to explore possibilities for future cultural and artistic exchanges.”

Creative New Zealand will provide director and choreographer Lemi Ponifasio and his acclaimed company MAU over $300,000 towards I AM; a compelling new theatre work inspired by the legacy of the First World War and its impact around the world. The work is co-produced by the Auckland Arts Festival and three other international festivals – Festival d’Avignon, Ruhrtriennale-International Festival of the Arts and the Edinburgh International Festival. I AM will make its world premiere at the Festival d’Avignon in France this July, before travelling to Edinburgh and Germany in August. In March 2015 it will return to New Zealand to be presented at the Auckland Arts Festival.

Creative New Zealand is providing $16,000 towards a project that involves composer Gareth Farr creating a 10 minute chamber music work, Relict Furies. A co-commission with the New Zealand Festival and the Edinburgh International Festival, Relict Furies explores the themes and memory of the impact of World War 1. Featuring a new libretto by Paul Horan, the work will make its world premiere at the Edinburgh International Festival this August and will also be presented at the New Zealand Festival in 2016.

Dunedin’s Ake Ake Theatre Company has been awarded just over $30,000 in funding for a collaborative international theatre piece with Serbian actress and director Sanja Krsmanovic Tasic. Sisters in Arms honours women’s role in the front lines of the First World War, in particular two of New Zealand's first women war surgeons Dr Jessie Scott and Dr Agnes Bennett. The production will premiere at Bitef Polyphony arts festival in Serbia this September, before being performed at Arts Festival Dunedin and the Nelson Arts Festival in October.

Creative New Zealand is offering a total of $1.5 million over the next three financial years through the First World War Centenary (WW100) Co-Commissioning Fund. This investment has been made possible by income from the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board.

Expressions of interest for the second funding round will close on 30 June 2014. Applications are assessed via a two-stage process.

Eligible works should relate to the themes of the WW100 programme, include at least one international commissioning partner and be presented in at least two countries (including New Zealand) during the WW100 commemorations period over 2014 to 2018.

Visit the Creative New Zealand website for further information on eligibly criteria and applying.


FURTHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION

I AM – Lemi Ponifasio/MAU & Auckland Festival (theatre)

Inspired by the legacy of the First World War and its impact around the world, Lemi Ponifasio/MAU’s I AM explores the power of art to point us to our ability to transform triumphantly without violence and pain, a direct challenge to the horrors wrought by war. I AM is an outrage, a prayer for the living as for the dead. I AM follows MAU collaborations with different international communities in works which confront the cities of empire and speak of a moment of revelation, the possibility of emerging out of the darkness of intense doubt, and of belonging. A co-production by Auckland Arts Festival, Festival d’Avignon, Ruhrtriennale-International Festival of the Arts and the Edinburgh International Festival, the work will premiere in Avignon this July (as part of the official French World War 1 Commemorations), before travelling to Scotland and Germany in August. The work will be presented in Auckland as part of the Auckland Arts Festival in 2015. More info: www.mau.co.nz


Relict Furies – Gareth Farr & New Zealand Festival (chamber music)

Composer Gareth Farr’s new work, Relict Furies is part of a vibrant celebration of the richness and diversity of music-making across the Commonwealth. Farr’s commission, with a libretto specially written by Paul Horan, will be performed by the Scottish Ensemble and Commonwealth Strings. Co-commissioned with the New Zealand Festival and the Edinburgh International Festival, Relict Furieswill make its world premiere at the Edinburgh International Festival this August and will also be presented in Wellington at the New Zealand Festival in 2016. More info: www.garethfarr.com


Sisters in Arms – Ake Ake Theatre Company & Sanja Krsmanovic Tasic (theatre)

Sisters in Arms is an Ake Ake Theatre Company collaboration with Serbian actress and director Sanja Krsmanovic Tasic. It honours women’s role in the front lines of the First World War, in particular two of New Zealand's first women war surgeons Dr Jessie Scott and Dr Agnes Bennett who served on the Serbian Front; as well as decorated woman soldier of the Serbian Army, Sergeant Sofija Jovanovic. The production, which will combine theatre, music and dance, will premiere at Bitef Polyphony arts festival in Serbia this September, before being performed at Arts Festival Dunedin (formerly the Otago Festival of the Arts) and the Nelson Arts Festival in October.


First World War Centenary (WW100) Co-Commissioning Fund

Creative New Zealand is offering a total of $1.5 million over the next three financial years through the First World War Centenary (WW100) Co-Commissioning Fund. This investment has been made possible by income from the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board.


The targeted fund supports national and international organisations to commission new, large-scale, collaborative work with New Zealand artists as part of the wider government programme to mark the First World War centenary (WW100).


Eligible projects will be collaborative and demonstrate potential for long-term relationships or cultural/artistic exchanges. The work should relate to the themes of the WW100 programme, include at least one international commissioning partner and be presented in at least two countries, including New Zealand. The works are to be presented nationally and internationally during the WW100 commemorations period over 2014 to 2018.


Expressions of interest for the second funding round will close on 30 June 2014. Applications are assessed via a two-stage process.


Visit the Creative New Zealand website for further information on eligibly criteria and applying.

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