Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Worst drivers think they’re the best drivers, says study

Worst drivers think they’re the best drivers, says study


71% of young motorists think they are better-than-average drivers, according to a British survey. This is despite the fact that young people are far more likely to die on the roads.
The survey, by the online survey company visioncritical.com, on behalf of the British Institute of Advanced Motorists, showed a startling gap between perception and reality.

75% of young males surveyed believed they were better-than-average drivers. 68% of young women believed they were better-than-average drivers .

These views are in complete conflict with the facts: young drivers make up just 8% of British motorists but nearly a quarter of road deaths.

Clive Matthew-Wilson, editor of the car review website dogandlemon.com, says he’s not surprised by the findings.

“Multiple studies have shown that the poorest performers in any field tend to be the ones who most overestimate their own ability.”

Matthew-Wilson adds:

“The British study also explains why it’s so hard to teach teenagers to drive safely. Even if teenagers take road safety messages onboard, they tend to believe these messages don’t apply to them, because they’re better-than-average drivers.”

“It also explains why 30 years of international studies have shown that telling young people to drive safely simply doesn’t work.”

Matthew-Wilson says that raising the driving age and restricting how and when young drivers can use their vehicles has been a far more effective strategy for saving lives.

“The older you are when you get behind the wheel, the safer you’re likely to be. Also, the fewer people sharing the car, the safer you’re likely to be.”

“From a road safety point of view, the ultimate nightmare is a poorly trained young driver sharing a car with friends late at night. This is a perfect set-up for a multiple fatality.”

Releas

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Kakī: World’s Rarest Wading Bird Released In Mackenzie Basin

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says the birds will add to the 60 released into the Tasman valley earlier this month, significantly boosting the wild population. More>>

ALSO:

IHC Tribute: Colin Meads

"While Colin is best known for rugby, to us he is one of a small number of distinguished IHC New Zealand Life Members recognised for their significant support for people with intellectual disabilities," says IHC Chief Executive Ralph Jones. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Tilting at Turbines - The Trip to Spain

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon have now both broken the Big Fifty barrier, which seems to have brought a whole new level of angst to their midlife adventures ... More>>

Review: A Rose By Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet

The Royal New Zealand Ballet has accepted the challenge of this heart-touching tragedy and largely succeeded. More>>

ALSO:

NZ's First Male IAAF Gold: Tom Walsh's Historic Shot Put Victory

Although feeling very sore but with a great feeling Tom Walsh took his place as number one on the victory dais to receive his much deserved gold medal. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Hard To Find Books

"Unfortunately we are in crisis and this friendly dinosaur faces extinction… Our only hope is to try and raise funds to buy the building and restore it to its glory, either fully funded or with a viable deposit." More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland