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New Glory Days magazine - the 1960s issue - out now

New Glory Days magazine - the 1960s issue - out now

The new issue of Glory Days, New Zealand's premier vintage lifestyle magazine (available now from www.glorydaysmagazine.com) takes an in-depth look at the 1960s – from mod to hippie and everything in between. It was the decade that rocked the world and spawned huge cultural, societal and stylistic changes that influence our lives today.

In the most diverse issue so far, you can read about everything from pop art, paisley and polyester to Go-go dancers, Crown Lynn crockery, tie dye, the dawn of television and shopping in San Francisco's Haight Ashbury, so you're sure to find something to pique your interest.

The team have long been fans of girl groups such as the Ronettes, Crystals andShangri-La's, so they decided to ask modern female musos to pay homage to the girl group phenomenon for their cover and fashion pages this issue. The captivating cover star is none other than the frontwoman for Labretta Suede and the Motel Six– herself no stranger to beehives and winged eyeliner.

Natasha Francois spent an afternoon with New Zealand's pop art pioneer Billy Apple, to hear tales of his time spent with David Hockney, Andy Warhol and other influential international sixties art practitioners. Their unique vision, style, and methods of producing art remain hugely influential on the visual language of advertising today.

Closer to home, we delve into the bach cupboard to unearth a story on New Zealand'sfavourite crockery, Crown Lynn, and chat with leading expert Valerie Monk about how to identify a rare find while you're op-shopping.

No sixties issue would not be complete without a comprehensive look at the fashions and music of the period which ushered in the teenage youthquake. Miniskirts, mod suits, polyester, paisley – the young consumer had a previously unimaginable range of looks and fabrics to choose from. Quite possibly no one demonstrated this shift better than the suited and Chelsea-booted Beatles in the early 60s to their kaftan-wearing later incarnation towards the end of the decade. Our resident music columnist Tina Turntables charts these era-defining sonic shifts and guest columnist MichaelSimons takes a detailed look at New Zealand's own musically transformative 'Beat Boom' period.

As always, Glory Days also features our regular columns from nostalgia, historical, pinup and vintage scenes including our new burlesque columnist, Miss La Vida, who will be sharing the page with Australian burlesque star Dolores Daquiri, David McKenzie introduces us to the world of Militaria, Aaron Carson kicks off his regular classic car and hot rod feature and we continue to cover vintage craft, beauty, fashion, blogging from New Zealand and beyond.

Glory Days vintage lifestyle magazine is published quarterly, features original content from NewZealand and Australia and is proudly designed and printed in New Zealand.

ENDS

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