Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Strongman Research a hit at Sports Symposium

Bay of Plenty Polytechnic: Strongman Research a hit at Sports Symposium

It was a sporting event of a different kind which saw 100 top sports researchers and industry leaders come to Tauranga last week. The New Zealand ITP Sports Research Symposium, hosted by Bay of Plenty Polytechnic, attracted delegates the depth and breadth of the country, from Dunedin to Whangarei and everywhere in between.

The Symposium saw the presentation of 20 research projects as diverse as the challenges of sports psychology, strength and conditioning, injury prevention, bone health, force-velocity, iPad use in teaching and learning, performance requirements of wicket-keeping, and lots more.

Peter Sommers, Group Leader Sport and Recreation at the Polytechnic, was impressed with the variety and the calibre of the research presentations.

“It was great to see all of the country’s ITPs (Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics) who deliver sport and recreation qualifications in one place. The knowledge sharing and calibre of research coming out of our country is incredible.”

Delegates agreed that one of the many highlights of the programme was a presentation by Polytechnic sports lecturer Paul Winwood on How coaches use strongman implements in strength and conditioning practice. Strongman is described as strength athletics where strength exercises transfer to places outside the weight room and can include anything from flipping tractor tyres and carrying heavy objects, to pulling heavy sleds.

“Paul’s research really captivated everybody,” said Peter. “His PhD study project went out globally to 220 strength and conditioning coaches. He received 270 responses from as far away as the UK and the NFL in America with the results being published shortly in the prestigious International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching.”

Peter went on to emphasise the importance of research informed teaching at the Polytechnic.

“It’s an institutional requirement that all of the sport and recreation teaching staff are research active within their particular fields so they’re gaining vital research knowledge that they can share with their students. This is where we can see the research and teaching really linking together – ensuring our students remain at the cutting-edge meaning they get the very latest research that is out there, and are getting it from the horse’s mouth.”

The Symposium highlighted the importance of ongoing collaboration between the institutions in order to continue to deliver cutting-edge research.

Ends.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

A Series Of Tubes: 150 Years Of The Cook Strait Cable

“It was a momentous achievement for its time. The successful connection came on the third attempt at laying the cable, and followed a near disaster when the first cable snapped - almost destroying the ship Weymouth in the process,” says Ms Adams. More>>

ALSO:

February 2017: Guns N' Roses - New Zealand Dates Announced

Founder Axl Rose and former members, Slash and Duff McKagan have regrouped for one of the century’s most anticipated tours... Rolling Stone said: "This was the real thing, the thing we'd all been waiting for: the triumphant return of one of the most important bands to cross rock music history. And it happened in our lifetime.” More>>

Werewolf: Brando, Peckinpah And Billy The Kid

Gordon Campbell: Initially, One-Eyed Jacks was supposed to have been directed by Stanley Kubrick from a script by Sam Peckinpah – yet it quickly became Brando’s baby... More>>

Book Awards: ANZAC Heroes Wins Margaret Mahy Book Of The Year

“Simply stunning, with gold-standard production values,” say the judges of the winner of this year’s Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award in the prestigious New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults. ANZAC Heroes is also the winner of the Elsie Locke Award for the Best Book in the Non-Fiction category. More>>

Baby Animals: Hamilton Zoo Rhino Calf Named

Hamilton Zoo’s latest rhino calf has been named Samburu and he's being celebrated with a unique zoo experience... Samburu arrived after his mother Kito’s 16-month pregnancy and the calf brings the number of white rhinos at Hamilton Zoo to six. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Rio Olympics

Were you pretty excited earlier this week when Vietnam won its first ever Olympic gold medal? Hanoi, reportedly, went wild... Perhaps we should keep Vietnam’s golden moment in mind as we gear up for saturation media coverage of New Zealand’s medal achievements in Rio. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news