Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Waka ama paddlers need exemption to wearing life jackets

Waka ama paddlers need exemption to wearing life jackets:


Waka ama guru James Papali’i has applied to speak at hearings regarding the composory requirement of people on vessels over 6meters to wear life jackets.

Mr Papali’i the co founder of one of N.Z most successful waka ama clubs namely Manukau Outrigger Canoeing Club and the Mangere based Portage Crossing Waka Ama Club says that the wearing of life jackets compromises the safety of paddlers and is unnessary because of all the other safety factors waka ama paddlers and clubs have already implemented.

Mr Papali’i talks about the traditional skills and paddling techniques that have been past down from the early polynesian voyagers of the pacific triangle to the modern waka ama paddlers of today. One of the most famous and challenging waka ama regatta in the world is the Molokai Crossing where paddlers fly to Molokai Island and six days later paddle back to Oahu through the Molokai channel a distance over 70Km. Mr Papali’i did this race in 1990
with the first N.Z waka ama crew led by the late Ace Greg Cuthers and Louise Henderson.

If life jackets were made compulsory to waka ama paddlers we could not compete in this regatta or any overseas regatta where change overs are necessary including regatta in New Zealand. Paddlers are required to change 3 paddlers at a time from the six person waka every 15 minutes so teams of nine can cover the long distance regatta. If paddlers were wearing life jackets they wouldn’t be able to get under the Kiato (outrigger) of the waka ama to complete the change over manover.

Waka ama paddlers are competant swimmers and life jackets, flares, safety support boats, and floatation devices are always on board. If paddlers were forced to wear them Mr Papali’i belives this will give them a false sence of security, it would hinder the paddlers tecniques and waka ama have two sealed compartments and front and rear that makes them float if they capzize.

Compusory wearing of life jackets impedes the culture and sport of waka ama and the already used safety requirements waka ama paddlers and clubs have implemented is more than adequate to keep paddlers safe.

As a waka ama paddler the composory wearing of a life jacket is not in our best interest.

Waka ama is a traditional and cultural way of life and the paddling techniques inhereted within the sport has been passed from generations dating back to the early vogages of the pacific triangle.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news