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Whānau and culture important to Māori

E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karangataha maha, tēnā koutou.

Whānau and culture important to Māori

6 May 2014

Most Māori think their whānau is doing well, according to results released today from Statistics New Zealand’s first survey of Māori well-being, Te Kupenga.

Results from the survey showed that 83 percent of Māori said their whānau was doing well. It also showed that 89 percent of Māori knew their iwi and 55 percent of Māori had some ability to speak te reo Māori.

“The survey results will help give an overall picture of the social and cultural well-being of Māori in New Zealand. This information will contribute to a better informed public debate on Māori well-being and identify key areas that need to be addressed,” Te Kupenga project manager Atawhai Tibble said.

While 70 percent of Māori adults nationally said it was important for them to be involved in things to do with Māori culture, the proportion varied regionally. Māori adults in Northland (82 percent) were most likely to say culture was important to them while those in Canterbury (59 percent) were the least likely.

“The most commonly reported modern cultural activity that Māori adults engaged in was watching a Māori television programme, with 75 percent of respondents having done so in the last 12 months,” Mr Tibble said.

The interviews were conducted between June and August last year with over 5,500 people of Māori ancestry aged over 15 from across the country. Statistics NZ would like to acknowledge the support of Te Puni Kōkiri in the development of Te Kupenga.

Further data from the survey will be released over the next 12 months and will include data on economic well-being and a report on te reo Māori.

See the Māori cultural well-being in 2013 poster for a visual representation of the survey's key findings.

He mea nui ki te Māori te whānau me te ahurea

I whakaputaina 6 Haratua 2014

Ki te nuinga o te Māori kei te pai ō rātau whānau, e ai ki ngā hua i whakaputaina inakuanei e te rangahau tuatahi a Tatauranga Aotearoa mō te oranga o te Māori, arā, Te Kupenga.

E whakaatu ana ngā hua o te rangahau he 83 ōrau o ngā Māori i kī kei te pai ō rātau whānau. I whakaatu anō e 89 ōrau o ngā Māori kei te mōhio ki tō rātau iwi, ā, e 55 ōrau o ngā Māori e āhua mōhio ana ki te kōrero i te reo Māori.

“Ka āwhina ngā hua o te rangahau kia āta mōhio ai ki te oranga pāpori me te ahurea o te Māori i Aotearoa. Ka tautoko ēnei kōrero kia mārama ake ai te kōrerorero a te iwi whānui mō te oranga o te Māori me te whakaatu hoki i ngā wāhi matua hei whakatika," hei tā Atawhai Tibble, te kaiwhakahaere o Te Kupenga.

Ahakoa e 70 ōrau o ngā pakeke Māori o te motu i kī he mea nui ki a rātau kia whai wahi rātau ki te ao Māori, he rerekē te ōwehenga kei tēnā rohe, kei tēnā rohe. He mea nui ki ngā Māori i te Taitokerau (82 ōrau) tō rātau ao Māori, ā, 59 ōrau i Waitaha kāore i te pēnei.

Hei tā Atawhai Tibble: "Ko te mahi ahurea o ēnei rā e pūrongo whānuihia ana a te pakeke Māori ko te mātakitaki i tētahi whakaaturanga pouaka whakaata Māori, ā, he 75 ōrau o ngā kaiwhakautu i mahi i tēnei i roto i ngā marama 12 kua pahure."

I whakahaerehia ngā uiuitanga i waenga i te marama o Pipiri ki te Hereturikōkā i tērā tau, ā, neke atu i te 5,500 ngā Māori mai i ngā tau 15 neke atu puta noa i te motu. E mihi ana a Tatauranga Aotearoa ki a Te Puni Kōkiri mō ana tautoko i roto i te whanaketanga o Te Kupenga.

Ka tukuna atu anō he raraunga mai i te rangahau i roto i ngā marama 12 e whai ake, ā, kei roto ko ngā raraunga mō te oranga ōhanga me tētahi pūrongo mō te reo Māori.

Tirohia te pānui whakaahua Te oranga o te ahurea Māori 2013 mō ngā hua matua a te rangahau nei. http://img.scoop.co.nz/media/pdfs/1405/Te_oranga_o_te_ahurea_Mori_2013.pdf

For more information about these statistics:
Te Kupenga 2013

Information release English (PDF)

Information release te reo Māori (PDF)

Te Kupenga 2013 – Correction [20/5/14]

20 May 2014

On 19 May 2014, we corrected some of the figures previously published in the Te Kupenga 2013 (English) and Te Kupenga (te reo Māori) information release on 6 May 2014.

The proportions for those who have been to their ancestral marae in the previous 12 months in tables 1–3 have changed due to an error in the previously published tables. The corrected tables are available from the 'Downloads' box on the web pages above.

The errors did not affect figures in the commentary or media release.

tekupenga13englishtables_corrected.xls

tekupenga13maoritables_corrected.xls

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