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Fauré Requiem by Candlelight

Fauré Requiem by Candlelight


“Everything I possessed in the way of religious illusion I put into my Requiem, which moreover is dominated from beginning to end by a very human feeling of faith in eternal rest,” – Gabriel Fauré, 1921

On Saturday June 7, Voices New Zealand Chamber Choir performs one of its highly popular candlelight concerts in the Wellington Cathedral, featuring Requiems by Fauré and Duruflé.

Their last candle-light concert at the Cathedral sold out. Music Director Karen Grylls promises that these Requiems will be just as effective.

“If the listener comes to them on their terms as settings of the Requiem text, at once peaceful, intimate, loving and with a confidence in eternal rest, then the listening experience will be profound,” Grylls says. “I have loved these works for a long time.”

Fauré’s 1893 Requiem is his greatest masterpiece, with outstanding settings of the Pie Jesu and In Paradisum. This performance features Hamilton-based soprano Jayne Tankersley and Opera Australia’s principal baritone Christopher Hillier as soloists. The edition used in this concert is by choral guru John Rutter, who restores Fauré's work to his original intentions: a liturgical Requiem with a simple organ and chamber ensemble accompaniment. Voices NZ will be accompanied by Orchestra Wellington and organist Michael Stewart.

Wellington-born mezzo soprano Bianca Andrew will join Hillier as soloist for the Duruflé.

Born in Normandy in 1902, Duruflé moved to Paris at age 17 to study organ, becoming one of France’s most distinguished organists. He published only a handful of compositions. His Requiem, completed in 1947 and written in memory his father, is the most famous of these. Grylls says it is “arguably the best-known 20th century Requiem, full of modal harmonies and effortless polyphony. Not only did he use the Gregorian motifs from the Office of the Dead (forcing himself to reconcile Gregorian rhythms with modern metres), but also the rich harmonies of Ravel and Fauré.”

Fauré Requiem by Candlelight with Duruflé Requiem
Saturday, 7 June at 7.30pm.
Voices New Zealand Chamber Choir and Orchestra Wellington conducted by Karen Grylls

Featuring soloists Jayne Tankersley, Christopher Hillier and Bianca Andrew together with organist Michael Stewart.
Tickets $35 Adult, $20 Student/child from Ticketek
Tel: 0800 TICKETEK (842 538)
Door sales will be CASH ONLY


ENDS

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