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ANZAC Day will matter to future generations

Young Kiwis say ANZAC Day will matter to future generations

Young New Zealanders are proud of the way Kiwis celebrate ANZAC Day and believe it will remain important to future generations, according to new research released following this year’s commemorations.

Colmar Brunton carried out the research to understand the way New Zealand youth (16-29 year olds) perceive and celebrate ANZAC Day.

An overwhelming 95% of those surveyed said they are proud of the way New Zealand celebrates ANZAC Day with 72% believing the day will remain important to future generations of Kiwis.

Colmar Brunton’s marketing and business development director Vanessa Clark says that in this age group males (81%) are more likely than females (65%) to see ANZAC Day as important to future generations.

“ANZAC Day remains important for our youth, particularly amongst young Kiwi men, who view the day as being integral to the continuing history of New Zealand.”

When asked to list the things ANZAC Day means to them, most (83%) said it was about honouring and remembering those who have died defending our country followed by 61% who see the day as an integral part of New Zealand’s history.

“There was a large personal connection to ANZAC Day with 45% of those surveyed saying they would be paying respects to their own family members who have served New Zealand in the military,” Ms Clark says.

Only 9% see ANZAC Day as a historic date that doesn’t have much meaning to them.

When asked how ANZAC Day makes them feel 63% said sad for those who have died in service and 50% felt proud to be a New Zealander.

While 35% of Kiwi youth planned to attend an ANZAC Day event this year, an impressive 80% said they would support the day by getting a red poppy.

Colmar Brunton spoke to 214 people online, representing a national spread of New Zealand youth (16-29 years old). The survey has a margin of error of + or – 6.9%.


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