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Greyhound racing collateral damage "Sickening"

Press release: Greyhound racing collateral damage "Sickening".

Begins/
Greyhound welfare advocates are demanding an independent investigation into the mysterious death of a Canterbury greyhound during training.

"Raw Energy was a 6 and a half year old, and a greyhound his age should have been retired, yet in mysterious circumstances, he lost his life during training " said greyhound welfare advocate Aaron Cross."

Even at that age, he still has well over half his life ahead of him, yet because he was a high earner, his trainers just kept pushing and in the end his body gave out."

"In any other circumstance, there would be questions as to how on earth this could happen."

The Greyhound Racing Industry Animal Welfare Officer has confirmed the dogs death, but gave no indication of an inquiry seeking a reason as to why the dog suddenly died.

"Its disappointing but not surprising that there will be no industry investigation" Said Mr Cross. "Its pretty clear that the dog racing industry regards sudden greyhound deaths as somewhat normal. If competing human athletes suddenly started dropping dead there would be a huge outcry and investigation, but for the racing industry race dogs are disposable commodities."

"Upon contacting the industries Animal Welfare officer we were told that the dog died on private property, and the appropriate paperwork was filled out. That's it, end of story."

"Is there a drugging issue here? With complacent industry attitudes and no independent oversight we will likely never know."

"'This is what happens when you have a gambling industry that causes considerable injuries and deaths to animals, self-regulates, lacks all transparency, and by its very design is at odds with animal welfare" said Mr Cross

"This poor dog, like all racing greyhounds, was pushed to its absolute maximum limits and his body expired. Its outrageous that the industry aren't even looking into this."

"We have a clear double standard from the government, they won't permit the suffering of animals for the vice of drug taking (party pill testing), but politicians are avoiding facing up to the hypocrisy of harming animals for the vice of gambling."

Mr Cross said a formal complaint has been laid with the SPCA but doesn't expect any action from the organization.

"Even the SPCA aren't really interested in the suffering of racing greyhounds. They say the right things, but do nothing. Greyhounds have no-one in their corner, only gambling interests that have turned mans best friend into a convenient ATM machine"

"The collateral damage is sickening."
/Ends

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