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Exhibition assembles full range of artist's practice

First exhibition to assemble full range of intriguing artist’s practice


Kim Pieters, still from Magnet 2009,


Atmospheric abstract paintings, drawings, photographs and moving-image soundscapes by Dunedin-based artist Kim Pieters feature in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening 27 May.

The exhibition surveys seven years of the artist’s output, from 2007 to the present, offering a concentrated insight into the range of works she has been making in and from her inner harbour studio in central Dunedin.

‘what is a life?’ is the challenging question posed by this artist, who, since the late 1980s, has dedicated herself to her practice, but who has yet to be recognised with a solo exhibition in a public gallery.

Her title—presented in lower case—sets the tone of the show, inviting visitors to ponder the fundamental questions of existence.

Since 1993, Kim Pieters has lived and worked in Dunedin, where she is an integral figure in the art and experimental music scenes. For more than two decades, her paintings and drawings have been included in exhibitions throughout New Zealand. Through the 1990s she was known for her bass playing and vocals in underground ensembles such as Dadamah, Rain, Flies inside the Sun, Pieters/Russell/Stapleton, DoraMaar and Sleep. In performance, these often featured Pieters’ moving-image projections. With musician, writer and curator Peter Stapleton, she founded the Metonymic music label and, in 2000, began the Dunedin experimental music festival ‘Lines of Flight’.

“The Adam Art Gallery is the perfect place to encounter the work of Kim Pieters,” says Adam Art Gallery Director, Christina Barton.

“The architecture of the building will allow visitors to spend time with Pieters’ works both singly and in juxtaposition and, for the first time, they will have the opportunity to see all the different dimensions of her practice together as one immersive experience.”

‘what is a life?’ will be launched with a unique performance by Eye, a trio of experimental musicians—Peter Stapleton, Peter Porteous and Jon Chapman—all with long histories of involvement in New Zealand underground music. They perform improvised psychedelic drones created with drums, guitar, analogue and digital electronics, shortwave radio, field recordings and Tibetan bells, which will be accompanied by Pieters’ projected film.

Pieters’ exhibition is accompanied by RELOAD: Kirk Gallery Series 2014, three one-work moving image installations by Shannon Te Ao, Hito Steyerl, and Eddie Clemens.

What: what is a life? an exhibition by Kim Pieters
Where: Adam Art Gallery, Victoria University of Wellington, Gate 3, Kelburn Parade
When: 27 May–21 September
Tuesday–Sunday, 11am–5pm (closed on Monday)
Free entry

First exhibition to assemble full range of intriguing artist’s practice

Kim Pieters, still from Magnet 2009, digital video, 00:56:15mins, audio by SEHT from ‘the green morning’ CD (Digitalis, 2006) © Kim Pieters

Atmospheric abstract paintings, drawings, photographs and moving-image soundscapes by Dunedin-based artist Kim Pieters feature in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening 27 May.

The exhibition surveys seven years of the artist’s output, from 2007 to the present, offering a concentrated insight into the range of works she has been making in and from her inner harbour studio in central Dunedin.

‘what is a life?’ is the challenging question posed by this artist, who, since the late 1980s, has dedicated herself to her practice, but who has yet to be recognised with a solo exhibition in a public gallery.

Her title—presented in lower case—sets the tone of the show, inviting visitors to ponder the fundamental questions of existence.

Since 1993, Kim Pieters has lived and worked in Dunedin, where she is an integral figure in the art and experimental music scenes. For more than two decades, her paintings and drawings have been included in exhibitions throughout New Zealand. Through the 1990s she was known for her bass playing and vocals in underground ensembles such as Dadamah, Rain, Flies inside the Sun, Pieters/Russell/Stapleton, DoraMaar and Sleep. In performance, these often featured Pieters’ moving-image projections. With musician, writer and curator Peter Stapleton, she founded the Metonymic music label and, in 2000, began the Dunedin experimental music festival ‘Lines of Flight’.

“The Adam Art Gallery is the perfect place to encounter the work of Kim Pieters,” says Adam Art Gallery Director, Christina Barton.

“The architecture of the building will allow visitors to spend time with Pieters’ works both singly and in juxtaposition and, for the first time, they will have the opportunity to see all the different dimensions of her practice together as one immersive experience.”

‘what is a life?’ will be launched with a unique performance by Eye, a trio of experimental musicians—Peter Stapleton, Peter Porteous and Jon Chapman—all with long histories of involvement in New Zealand underground music. They perform improvised psychedelic drones created with drums, guitar, analogue and digital electronics, shortwave radio, field recordings and Tibetan bells, which will be accompanied by Pieters’ projected film.

Pieters’ exhibition is accompanied by RELOAD: Kirk Gallery Series 2014, three one-work moving image installations by Shannon Te Ao, Hito Steyerl, and Eddie Clemens.

What: what is a life? an exhibition by Kim Pieters
Where: Adam Art Gallery, Victoria University of Wellington, Gate 3, Kelburn Parade
When: 27 May–21 September
Tuesday–Sunday, 11am–5pm (closed on Monday)
Free entry

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