Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


Everyone Can Write

Everyone Can Write

You have an piece of writing due tomorrow and are stuck sitting there looking at a blank screen. You pace the floor back and forth, clean the house, make dinner, and do anything but start writing.

You have first-sentence syndrome.

Many people find it difficult to write that first sentence whether it is in an essay, a report, or narrative writing and can often result in writers block.

But don’t fret, Howard Gelman who has taught writing for over 25 years has written a book titled Everyone Can Write where he explains little steps you can take to cure you of first-sentence syndrome and start writing.

Everyone Can Write is a practical ‘how to write’ book that solves problems that beginner writers struggle with by giving them an easy to follow and simple set of rules that allows them to write rapidly and clearly.

He has a three-step formula: Pre-write, free-write and re-write, which helps you improve quality of work, research necessary information, and editing.

This book is great for aspiring writers who feel they have something to write about but need the tools to get started and for struggling writers who need a push to get back on track.

Everyone Can Write is the essential pocket reference for anyone from a student to a business executive.

AUTHOR: Howard Gelman is an associate lecturer at the Faculty of Arts at Macquarie University, where he teaches business and media communications. He has worked in broadcasting, producing programs in Britain, USA and Australia where he was commissioning editor for ABC. He has project edited many non-fiction trade and business books and has also developed writing workshops in Sydney, London, New York and Chicago. He was inspired to write this book, as he truly believes that ‘everyone can write’.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Art Review: Fiona Pardington's A Beautiful Hesitation

An aroma of death and decay perfumes this extraordinary survey of Fiona Pardington's work with faint forensic scents of camphor and formaldehyde. Eight large-format still-lifes dominate the main room, while other works reveal progressive developments in style and subject-matter. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news