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Depot Artspace Celebrates Festival of Photography


Depot Artspace Celebrates Festival of Photography

Flora Photographica Aotearoa
24 May – 12 June
Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 24 May 1 – 3pm hosted by Maggie Barry ONZM, MP for North Shore

From Wanganui’s McNamara Gallery Photography and as part of the Auckland Festival of Photography, the Depot Artspace is pleased to present an exhibition that explores our indigenous and exotic botanical world through some of New Zealand's most renowned photographers.

Laurence Aberhart, Greta Anderson, Wayne Barrar, Janet Bayly, AndrewBeck, Gary Blackman, Rhondda Bosworth, Joyce Campbell, Ben Cauchi, Max Coolahan [1918–1985], Lisa Crowley, Derek Henderson, FrankHofmann [1916–1989], John Johns [1924–1999], Ian Macdonald, AnneNoble, Richard Orjis, Fiona Pardington, Peter Peryer, HaruhikoSameshima, C. Brian Smith

GALLERY TALK: 2pm Saturday 31st of May with Ann Elias, Associate Professor, Sydney College of the Arts, the University of Sydney. She will also be in conversation with photographer Peter Peryer, formerly a long term Devonport resident.

This exhibition is supported by Maggie Barry MP and Grant Kerr.

Jonny Davis: Up the Coast
24 May – 12 June
Opening in Project Space
Saturday 24 May 1 – 3pm

In this ongoing body of work, Up the Coast explores the East Cape, a stretch of coast that is papakāinga to many, but is the day to day home to few. Jonny Davis’ works capture some of the community spaces and facilities along the coast - places that seemingly lie in waiting to host whanau returning home. The images are characterised by an expansive ocean backdrop, rugged foreshore, narrow meandering roads and these quiet, waiting places.

Brendan Kitto: Night Vision
24 May - 12 June

Opening in the Vernacular Lounge
Saturday 24 May 1 – 3pm

Night Vision is a new series revealing hidden truths about the nature of graffiti, presenting an insider’s view into the underground world of street art.
There is a common misconception that graffiti writers are criminals; nothing more than vandals when in reality they may be the nice guy next door, a teacher, youth worker or may even hold a PhD. Why do they do it? The thrill? The fame? This exhibition invites you to take a peek from the inside and decide for yourself.

Brendan Kitto has been involved in the graffiti scene for the past 13 years and before that was heavily involved with skateboarding. During this period of time, Kitto realised that documentation is just as important as participation.

Maureen Tan: Boatless Horizon
24 May – 12 June
Opening in Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 24 May 1 – 3pm

“In the depths of decay a future shrouded in fog. Rare glimpses of what lies ahead and then they’re gone - was it revelation or just the minds hunger for hope? Location Cuba, destination unknown.”

Boatless Horizon represents the people of Cuba, as they are not permitted to board boats and surveillance along the coast is omnipresent. Maureen Tan’s images are based largely around a crumbling and neglected backdrop, capturing poise amidst the undercurrent of socialism.

Maureen Tan is an award winning photographer and graphic designer, and has over 10 years of globe-trotting experience capturing landscapes and people. As well as her commercial projects, she has exhibited her photography in various galleries. Many of her photos have been licensed for commercial and editorial use with proceeds donated to charitable organisations. She also has work in the Wallace Art Trust Collection.


ends

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