Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Kaokao highlights histories with 200m of reflective tape

23 May 2014

Kaokao highlights histories with 200m of reflective tape

Kaokao is a large-scale installation that has been made by the many hands of Mata Aho Collective. Exhibiting at Toi Pōneke from 6-28 June, Kaokao uses industrial materials to reflect and highlight the whakataukī:

He wāhine, he whenua, ka ngaro te tangata.
Without women and without land, humanity is lost.

Kaokao is a tukutuku pattern synonymous with strength and is associated with birthing positions. Customarily portrayed as a female art form, tukutuku are made by two people working together. The pattern also denotes a warrior’s stance and is reminiscent of a military chevron used to decorate the sleeves of soldiers.

With these aspects in mind, this collective of four Māori women have chosen Kaokao as both the literal and conceptual basis to explore the portrayal of women within Māori and non-Māori wartime histories.

“The work of the Mata Aho Collective puts art and collaboration central to the ongoing process of weaving new knowledge together” says Arts Advisor, Jodie Dalgleish. “In Kaokao they create a site of contention, where histories can be explored and the role of women in war is given as much thought as the role of men.”

Inspired by the upcoming WW1 commemorations, Kaokao highlights the roles women play in wartime and portrays a desire for a restorative balance.

“Our work acknowledges the many wāhine who have stood in front, alongside and behind their contemporaries to care and protect their whenua and whānau.”

Ki te mate ngā tane, me mate anō ngā wāhine me ngā tamariki hoki.
If the men die, so too do the women and children.
- Ahumai Te Paerata in the 1864 Battle of Ōrakau.

Mata Aho Collective is a group of contemporary artists who combine individual practices. Formed through friendship and common ideologies, the group enjoys making art together, sharing many laughs, ideas and responsibilities.

Erena Baker (Te Atiawa ki Whakarongotai, Ngāti Toa Rangātira) completed a Masters in Māori Visual Arts with First Class Honours through Massey University, Palmerston North in 2009.

Sarah Hudson (Ngāti Awa, Ngāi Tūhoe) completed a Masters in Fine Arts with high distinction through Massey University in 2010.

Bridget Reweti (Ngāti Ranginui, Ngāi Te Rangi) completed a Masters in Māori Visual Arts, First Class Honors at Massey University, Palmerston North and also holds a Post-Graduate Diploma in Museum Studies from Victoria University, Wellington.

Terri Te Tau (Rangitāne ki Wairarapa) is currently working towards a PhD in Fine Arts at Massey University in Palmerston North. She holds a Post-Graduate Diploma in Māori Visual Arts and a Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts Massey University.

Mata Aho Collective's recent exhibitions include:
Camp a Low Hum, Wainuiomata. 2014
Pūwawau. Aratoi, Masterton. Group show. 2013
Old Hall Gigs. Vogelmorn Hall, Wellington. 2013
Te Whare Pora. Enjoy Public Art Gallery Summer Residency, Wellington. 2012-13

Kaokao opens at 5.30pm on 5 June at Toi Pōneke Gallery, 61 Abel Smith Street.

For further information you can contact: mataahocollective@gmail.com

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online

  • Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

    “Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

    ALSO:

    Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

    Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

    ALSO:

    Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

    Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

    ALSO:

    Scoop Review Of Books: Excerpt - Ice Bear: The Cultural History Of An Arctic Icon

    “During the last decade the image of the polar bear has moved in the public imagination from being an icon of strength, independence and survival in one of the most climatically extreme of world environments, to that of fragility, vulnerability and more generally of a global environmental crisis.” More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news