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I Am Auckland awards recognise local youth work

I Am Auckland awards recognise local youth work

As part of becoming the ‘world’s most liveable city’, Auckland Council, the Youth Advisory Panel and The Cube are holding the inaugural I Am Auckland Awards.

The awards recognise the work of individuals and youth organisations which support children and young people. Local artist Lorde has shown her support for the awards in an online video, found here: bit.ly/iamauckland

2014 Young New Zealander of the Year Parris Goebel has encouraged young people to vote for their heroes. “I wouldn’t have been able to do any of this without the people who have moulded me and made me believe in myself,” she says. “This is an amazing opportunity to give back to the people who have helped us reach our dreams.”

The awards mark the launch of the I Am Auckland strategic action plan, which sets goals that will dramatically accelerate the prospects of children and young people across the region. Led by the Youth Advisory Panel, the plan was developed using the feedback of thousands of children and young people, ensuring the opinions of Auckland’s youth are considered in community and civic decision-making.

“I Am Auckland challenges society to put children and young people first,” says Youth Advisory Panel Chairperson Flora Apulu. “Those who work with youth know what this means, and it’s evident in the hard work they do and the lives they change. It’s important for us to support and recognise these people and organisations as they inspire and empower our youth to reach their full potential.”

Multi-faceted organisation The Cube encourages youth-led development, and Director Catherine Cooper is excited to be working with local youth in delivering the I Am Auckland awards.

“The awards are developed and facilitated by young people,” she says. “They give young people the opportunity to recognise the importance of youth workers and youth organisations, and vote on those that are doing truly great work.”

The awards will raise awareness of the goals of the I Am Auckland plan and encourage individuals and youth organisations to work towards achieving these. Nominations can be made online at www.iamauckland.co.nz, and are judged by the Youth Advisory Panel based on each of the I Am Auckland plan’s goals. Winners will be announced at the I Am Auckland action plan launch in July.

The I Am Auckland plan will guide Auckland’s development over the next 30 years. “It offers the opportunity for young people to be completely involved in shaping the future they will belong to,” says Flora. “It’s a future that is not only meaningful for them, but also for their families and the communities.”

ENDS

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