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Trees: An Enjoy Occasional Journal - submission closing

Submissions Close Monday, 16 June, 2014
Trees: An Enjoy Occasional Journal

http://blog.enjoy.org.nz/occasional-journal/

There is just over a week left to get your proposals in for Trees: the Third Enjoy Occasional Journal.
Please send your proposals and any questions to: journal@enjoy.org.nz

Trees are the subjects of our wonder and awe. They create the air that we breathe, provided our earliest form of fuel and on many occasions outlive us spectacularly. When we’re amongst them, they can provide aesthetic and physical respite. We inhabit trees as places of leisure and astounding architectural structures; they’re fodder for our art and canvases for our love notes. We torture some into bizarre small shapes, and yet marvel at how huge others can grow. They make up the structure of our homes and furniture, are sources of food and ancient medicine, and vehicles for learning. They populate our myths and enrich spiritual and religious practices; set scenes for fairy tales and in some cultures form the basis of our universe. Closer to home, dendroglyphs found throughout Aotearoa and Rekohu/Wharekauri (Chatham Islands) reflect the histories of Māori and Moriori peoples.

Trees are signifiers of regimes, markers of war and tyranny. The dark depths of humanity have co-opted them through colonialisation, ultra nationalism, racism and globalisation. They’re an all-important factor in combating climate change, but in Latin America and South East Asia, they’re the subject of corporate greed, rampant deforestation and colonisation. Trees are critical to humanity, to our basic living, our political and economic wellbeing and to our vision, desire and identity: our lives depend on them.

In 2014, Enjoy is compiling a third, online edition of our occasional journal. It focuses on the theme of trees, but is broad and far-reaching in its interest and investigation of this subject. The journal will present a cache of eclectic, intriguing and informed material across the field of contemporary art in all its forms and with regard to all its concerns. While it will feature New Zealand practice and content, it will also showcase New Zealand work alongside international content, and international submissions are sought.

We invite writers and artists to engage with this subject matter by submitting an abstract or a proposal for an artist portfolio, page work or a piece of writing.

ENDS

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