Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Friday 13th June: Black TieDay

Friday 13th June: Black TieDay

“Black Friday” 13th June is a red letter day for the national opera company, New Zealand Opera. Cartons of black-tie outfits and ballroom costumes will be unloaded from among 16 tonnes of staging being set up by an army of opera technicians at Auckland’s Aotea Centre, all in readiness for dress rehearsals of the world’s most popular opera, La traviata. But that is just the start.

For the first time ever, the company is simultaneously rehearsing two fully costumed and staged major operas, as it moves towards a record-breaking three-city period of concurrent activity later this month. Literally within hours of the La traviata cast and crew transferring from the lofty opera technical centre in Onehunga to the Aotea Centre main stage, the director and cast of La bohème arrive for their first rehearsal. This much-loved opera will be staged in Christchurch in July, overlapping the Wellington season of La traviata.

Both these contemporary NZO productions involve large choruses, casts of local and international opera stars, and full orchestras. With artists from as far afield as Scotland and New York joining a trove of local opera singers, the season is a logistical masterwork in itself, especially taking into account the shipping containers of scenery and costumes moving between Adelaide Auckland and Christchurch.

The extraordinary level of activity is partly the result of the company’s determination to maintain the presence of professional opera in Christchurch in addition to its other stage and increasing educational commitments. The new General Director of NZ Opera (NZO), Stuart Maunder, has expressed a wish that all three main centres should have at least two main operas a year (but preferably not all at once!). He believes the company is unique in encompassing three cities, each with its very own established Chapman Tripp Opera Chorus and individual orchestra. “It’s a special model that has clearly worked very well for the company and will serve it well in the future”.

Meantime, the audiences in three cities are likely to reflect the diversity of these cutting-edge, modern productions. While the black ties seen in La traviata’s glittering ballroom will remain the choice for some opera-goers, there will also be black jeans, just like those worn by the students whose loves and lives are featured in La bohème.

SEASON DETAILS:

LA TRAVIATA

Auckland – ASB Theatre, Aotea Centre

19, 21, 25, 27 June 7.30pm; 29 June 2.30pm

Wellington – St James Theatre

11, 17, 19 July 7.30pm; 13 July 2.30pm; 15 July 6pm


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news