Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Records fall as freedivers rise

Records fall as freedivers rise


Palmerston North based Architect Kathryn Nevatt, 34, held her breath for 7 minutes and 40 seconds over the weekend to set a new New Zealand record in the freediving discipline of Static Apnea, furthering her own record by 6s, ranking her first in the world so far this year and third in the all time rankings. Nevatt also won the overall event completing 143m dynamic with fins and 152m dynamic without fins – events where the diver swims as far as possible (multiple lengths) under water on a single breath wearing a monofin (like a mermaid’s tail) or doing a kind of breaststroke. “I didn’t expect to be ready to break a record at this competition, it’s the start of our indoor season and I have not yet reached my peak, but the static felt great, I was really relaxed and clear headed the whole way through and was able to stay calm and just enjoy being in the water” says Nevatt.

The annual Wellington Winter Champs are held at the Arena Aquatic Centre in Porirua and organised by Wellington’s Lazy Seal Freediving Club.

Wanganui HR Officer Tania Rounthwaite, 40, who trains with Nevatt in the Palmerston North based Breathtakers Freediving Club took out second place overall in the competition, ahead of all the men, and set a new personal best in dynamic with fins of 151m. “I’m thrilled to finally push past a barrier that has been hindering me for a while and add almost a length to my personal best” stated Rounthwaite.

Third place in the overall competition and first in the men’s division went to Sam Barnes, 59, Salesman from Hamilton who completed a personal best dynamic with fins of 168m, re-enforcing the fact that the sport is ageless.

Ali Al Khalifah from the Auckland Freediving Club set 3 new Saudi Arabian national records records with a 4:26 static, 87m dynamic with fins and 79m dynamic without fins.

While most people have partaken in a n impromptu breath holding competition as kids or been snorkelling on their tropical holidays, freediving remains a niche sport in NZ with an immaculate safety record and multiple Kiwi world champions. Divers calm themselves prior to their dive and during the dive experience a “Mammalian Dive Response” which slows the heart rate and forces blood back to the vital organs to assist the body in conserving oxygen and allows for the mind-blowing times and distances achieved. Divers must surface conscious at the completion of their dive and complete a strict surface protocol, or are disqualified. There were no black outs during the competition but loss of consciousness is a serious consideration, and anyone thinking about taking up the sport is encouraged to join a club or take a course to learn safe practises.

The Breathtakers Freediving Club is offering an Intro Night at the Lido 5:30pm on Tuesday 10 June for anyone keen to learn a little about the sport and wanting to see how long they can hold their breath. Nevatt notes that most beginners find they can hold their breath between 2 and 4 minutes with good instruction and a safe environment. Bookings are essential.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Cap Bocage: Anti-Mining Campaign Doco Debuts At NZ Film Festival

Playing at this year’s New Zealand International Film Festival, Cap Bocage is a close-up exploration of the forces that came into play when environmental issues and indigenous rights became intertwined in New Caledonia ... More>>

Film Fest:

More Film:

Sharon Ellis Review: A View From The Bridge

Arthur Miller’s A View From the Bridge is Circa’s latest big production, it opened on Saturday 19 July and it is a stunning triumph. More>>

Māori Language Week: He Karanga Kia Kaha Ake Te Tīhau Ki Te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission wishes to see social media swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori using the hashtag #tekupu. More>>

ALSO:

Book Vote: Kiwis Prefer Young Adult & Classics

To compile their Top 100 List for 2014, Whitcoulls again asked New Zealanders to vote for their favourite books and authors. And while classic novels continue to appeal to Kiwi readers, 2014 marks a significant new trend – the increasing popularity of novels for young adults. More>>

ALSO:

Five NZ Cities: Bill Bailey Back To The Southern Hemisphere

The gap between how we imagine our lives to be and how they really are is the subject of Bill’s new show Limboland. With his trademark intelligence and sharp wit, he tells tales of finding himself in this halfway place. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Book Television Is Coming

Carole Beu of The Women’s Bookshop in Auckland, Graham Beattie of The Book Blog and producer Deb Faith of FaceTV have raised enough money via crowd funding at Boosted – just under $7,000 so far – for 12 episodes, which begin production in September, and will be on screen later that month. More>>

Electric Sheep: Light Nelson Exceeds All Expectations

Light Nelson exceeded all expectations drawing over 40,000 people over two nights to the Queens Gardens and surrounds. The event, with over 40 installations from local and national artists, is in its second year, and organisers were hoping they’d top last year’s crowd of 16,000. More>>

MacGyver: Richard Dean Anderson To Attend Armageddon This October

New Zealand’s biggest pulp-culture event, the Armageddon Expo is proud to announce the world’s most recognised DIY action hero will be attending the Auckland event at the ASB Showgrounds from October 24th to 27th. More>>

ALSO:

Barbershop Gold: Māori Party Singing Praises Of The Musical Island Boys

The Maori Party has congratulated four young men on a mission, who in 2002 took up barbershop singing at Tawa College, and tonight took out the Gold Medal in the 2014 International Barbershop Harmony Society competitions in Las Vegas. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news