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National series brings moko researcher to Napier

10 June 2014

National series brings moko researcher to Napier

The art of moko will be discussed at a Royal Society of New Zealand event in Napier next month, as part of its Ten by Ten series. Professor Ngahuia Te Awekotuku will tell the story of the history and revival of moko, and describe how the search for information led her team to manuscripts and artefacts held by institutions across the world.

In addition, she will discuss the community participation that was an essential part of this work – how the pan-tribal team interviewed moko wearers and artists and examined the cultural and spiritual issues surrounding moko, including the controversy sometimes apparent in modern life.

The event will be held at:
Wednesday 11 June at 7.30pm
MTG Century Theatre
9 Herschell Street, Napier
The lecture is free and open to the general public. However, to ensure a seat, please obtain a ticket at

MTG Hawke’s Bay will also open its exhibition galleries from 6.00pm – 7.30pm for audience members to view prior to the talk, free of charge. MTG Hawke’s Bay has a diverse collection of taonga relating to the art of moko and will have some examples on display before the talk.

This event, held in collaboration with MTG Hawke's Bay, is part of a series of events celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Marsden Fund, a research fund that supports excellence in science, engineering, maths, social sciences and the humanities in New Zealand.

Ngahuia Te Awekotuku works at the University of Waikato researching ritual, heritage and gender issues. She is of Te Arawa, Waikato and Tuhoe descent and has worked for many years in the heritage and creative sectors as a curator, governor and advocate. Her book Mau Moko: The World of Maori Tattoo, was the winner of the inaugural Nga Kupu Ora Maori book of the decade.

About the Royal Society of New Zealand
The Royal Society of New Zealand promotes science, technology and humanities in schools, in industry and in society. We administer funds for research, publish peer-reviewed journals, offer advice to government, and foster international scientific contact and co-operation.

About MTG Hawke’s Bay
MTG Hawke’s Bay – Museum Theatre Gallery is home to a nationally significant collection of art and objects that form the foundation of distinctive exhibitions and a world-class research facility. The MTG Century Theatre hosts a lively programme of film and performing arts.


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