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NZ's longest running TV chat show tops 250 episodes

New Zealand’s longest running TV chat show “The Beat Goes On,” tops 250 episodes


The longest running television chat show in New Zealand’s historyThe Beat Goes On, celebrates the completion of 250 episodes this month on the 23rd of June 2014.

Creator and founder of the show Gerard Smith says it’s been a massive ride and he is very proud to have arrived at this point. It’s an historic moment.”

Smith adds he receives many complimentary emails, confirming we have a great product. When you add it all up, it's gratifying to realise that in the last 6 years we have done so many programmes and interviewed so many great people.”

Every week the Beat Goes On provides an opportunity for long form interviews with personalities, businesses and ordinary people doing amazing things. With the way TV is funded these days, Gerard says these interviews would never happen on mainstream TV. “We are capturing NZ history.”

The one hour show is a mix of entertainment, politics, and interviews with Kiwi personalities or travelling international celebrities. Best of all the stories once broadcast are living a new life online. For example the interview with Gerry Marsden from Gerry and the Pacemakers, has now received 25,000 views on You Tube.

Gerard as host of the Beat Goes On, is also remembered for his days as lead singer of the famous NZ group The Rumour. But that was the 70's, when his main focus was music, today it's television. Starting with the Beat Goes On, the business has grown . Today Gerard's production unit is making four different TV shows per week including the Beat Goes On. We now produce Rockin’ the Planet featuring live NZ bands and interviews, again not covered by mainstream TV, Automotive News, about the NZ car industry and the Guest List about weddings and events. And there is more in the pipeline

Helping make it happen are the six staff, along with his regular contributors Barry Rushton, and Shane Hales, who have done all 250 shows.

Gerard remembers why it started. I felt that ten years ago baby boomers were being slowly marginalised. They were telling me there was nothing to watch on TV that was relevant or inspirational , commercial stations were geared towards the young female home shopper and everyone got trampled in the rush. Their needs dominated all the viewing. “But that still left a sizable segment of the population with a large disposable income missing out. Week after week we now cater for that segment, Our audience may be past 50 but they have money to spend and we tempt them to book for that cruise, to buy that new car, get involved in a race horse syndicate, or splurge on a motor home. We reflect on the fact that past the age of 50 we still have hopes and dreams, a marathon to run, a mountain to climb, a CD to make or a book to write.”

Gerard says a special thanks must be made their long term advertisers, they have made it all possible. From travel, herbal supplements, kitchen renovation, motorhomes and horse racing syndicates to name a few, their support makes it all happen week after week

To finish Gerard says he likes making a difference, he loves his job and at 67 years he reckons he’s got about another 40 years to live, hitting the century!

www.thebeatgoeson.co.nz


ends

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