Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Bachelor of Creative Technologies Graduate Exhibition

Bachelor of Creative Technologies Graduate Exhibition Opening Saturday 21 June 2014 Between 5.30pm And 8pm


The three year Bachelor of Creative Technologies degree culminates in a graduation exhibition which showcases the best of student work from a range of creative technology discipline areas including Visual Arts, Film, Animation, Graphic Design, Photography and Interdisciplinary Practice.

Exhibition Title: VI

When: Opening 21 June 5.30pm

Exhibition Runs from 23 June to 27 June 2014

Where: 19 Tory Street Art Space, Wellington

Who: 6 Graduating students on the Bachelor of Creative Technologies degree

Creative Technologies Head of School Teriu Lemon will speak at the exhibition opening this Saturday. Students will be showcasing their extraordinary work and welcome the opportunity to speak with members of the creative and digital technology community.

“Astraea” by Alex Moses.

Creative Technologies will become of the exciting new campus planned for Cuba St and opening in 2018. For more information on the Centre for Creative Technologies and Arts view (http://www.weltec.ac.nz/ABOUTWELTEC/NewsandEvents/NewCreativeTechnologiesandArtsCentre/tabid/1464/Default.aspx)

Zoe Robinson - 24 Hours of Wellington: 24 Hours of Wellington is a film about Wellington City and its surrounding region. The project was completed over the course of three months using three DSLR cameras and is composed of over 15,000 photos.

Statement

“24 Hours of Wellington is a short technical film that I have wanted to make for a long time and was given the opportunity this year. I was inspired by spontaneous weekend drives my friends and I would take around Wellington to beautiful spots that we never knew existed beforehand. I wanted to encapsulate the beauty of the Wellington region and the places we rarely have time to stop by and appreciate.”

Selina Van Doorn - Chaos At Its Finest

Statement

“The process of my work consists of digital photography, collage and the 19th century photographic process of Cyanotypes which produces the prussian blue. I have deconstructed my images and created new perspectives of the nights I have been a part of. I have a love for live music and the energy created between the performers and the audience. I can feel the rise and fall of bodies in the room and it rattles my bones in a chaotic silence which is shown through the fragments of images.”

Laura O'Shea - What's Their Story

Statement

“For me photography is about more than just capturing beautiful pictures, it should be about telling a story - telling one story at a time. Identity, mystery, freedom, and the unknown is what lead me to decide that it was time to stop walking past everyday life, and to start appreciating the little things that are around us all every day. My goal is to try and put a smile on a few people’s faces and create a catalogue of New Zealander’s. This catalogue gave me a chance to explore one story at a time.”

Tama Al Posimani:

Statement

Identity, mythology, symbolism, rites of passage, are themes that occur in my work. A Polynesian word or phrase may trigger ideas for a painting and I do several sketches in my workbook to workout compositions. My process involves photoshop and photography. I use these mediums for generating visual ideas and to increase my production time. For my final year at WelTec I used the Polynesian word Fonua, as a starting off point for this series of paintings. They are based upon the 12 years I had spent on Niue Island.

Alex Moses:

Statement

“Astraea” was an experiment from beginning to end. I wanted to combine elements of illustration, which have always been an important part of my practice, with animation. Having only used 3D animation in the past I used this opportunity to gain a better understanding of 2D animation that combines both drawing and 3D models.

The work pulls inspiration from Noir Detective stories merged with early 20th Century Weird Fiction as well as elements of Science Fantasy. The final animation acts as an introduction to two characters and a small slice of the world they live in. My plan is to continue to tell the stories of these characters and flesh out their fictional world through a variety of media as I grow as a practitioner and continue to experiment.

Jordan Winnie:

Statement

With my project, I wanted to challenge myself by straying outside of my usual creative outputs into something much more tactile and physical. On a foundation of my own created narrative base, I sculpted characters from scratch to populate the world and the storyline I had created. It is a cathartic process for me, with each of the characters representing mental issues that I and many others have struggled with. Drawing inspiration from a fantasy basis, I wanted to subvert the usual fantasy tropes by creating a narrative in which all the main roles are strong females.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news