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Pinhole Photography, Woolly Brains and Plastic Fantastic

Pinhole Photography, Woolly Brains and Plastic Fantastic




Depi Corset


Ancient photographic techniques, woollen sculptures, waxy paintings and recycled plastic are just some of the features of the artwork being exhibited at this year’s NZ Art Show. The Show, the largest curated art sale in the country, will feature some 3,000 artworks by around 250 artists from New Zealand’s four corners, and some artists currently living overseas. This year also sees the return of Ben Timmins as an exhibiting artist: Ben won the coveted Signature Piece Art Award three years in a row.

NZ Art Show executive director Carla Russell says, “This year we’re really excited about the materials and techniques that a number of our artists are showcasing: testimony that New Zealand artists are truly becoming quite sophisticated in the ‘language’ of art.”

Wellington based photographer Ryan McCauley, new to the show this year and a Single Artist Wall exhibitor, uses a pinhole camera he constructed himself to create mostly landscape work with a distinctly moody style. Textile artist Sarah Peacock from Te Kuiti, also new to the show, creates her sculptures out of raw wool and her works can be best described as both grotesque and humorous. In 2012 she was a runner up in the World of Wearable Art open section: that piece is now part of the Te Papa collection. Taranaki artist John Shewry, who has exhibited with the show for the last 2 years, uses his art as a platform to voice his social views in humorous and thought-provoking ways. Materials that people discard are transformed into monumental commentaries: his works are honest reflections of his ideas surrounding humanity, race and destruction.

Carla Russell says that original artists like the aforementioned help make the show the dynamic event it is renowned for. “Over the past 10 years, the NZ Art Show has won a reputation for showcasing original, collectable and accessibleNew Zealand art at affordable prices. The Show provides visitors with the opportunity to start or add to their art collection while at the same time supporting New Zealand artists and the arts community. With some 3,000 artworks on sale and a projected average price of around $650, we’re confident that you’ll be able to find the perfect piece that suits you.”

As in previous years, the Show is being held in the TSB Bank Arena on Wellington’s waterfront over three days. The Show opens with a Gala Evening on Thursday, 24 July, with open days from Friday, 25 July to Sunday, 27 July 2013.

“This year’s Show triumphs what’s gone before in terms of the standard of the artwork, the range and combination of media, and the presentation of the artwork. It promises to be our most exciting ever. The artwork submitted was exceptional and the selection panel have selected works by established and renowned artists, many of whom have exhibited at past Shows and whose work continues to evolve, as well as that of talented, emerging artists.”

Visitors will also recognise the work of returning artists – mixed media artists Mia Hamilton, Ilya Volykhine and Tony Harrington; painters Tetyana Khytko, John Reid and Shirley Cresswell; and ink and watercolour artist Rika Nagahata.

New exhibitors whose work captured the attention of the selection panel include contemporary painters Ra Churchin and Jamie Mackman, and printmaker Lisa Grennell. Other emerging artists to look out for include Kendal Mustard, who was an Emerging Arts Award finalist last year, and 2013 Signature Piece Art Award finalist and mixed media artist Rebecca Philips.

A full list of the exhibiting artists for this year’s Show is on the website, see http://artshow.co.nz/uploads/files/artists_exhibiting_in_the_nz_art_show_2014.pdf. Artworks by artists with Single Artist Walls can be viewed athttp://artshow.co.nz/admin/Gallery+2014+SAWs and Solo Panel artists works here http://artshow.co.nz/GALLERY+2014+SOLOS

The Art Show is open to the public by general admission. The art displayed is constantly changing so there is always something different to see. Tickets cost $10 each, concessions $7, with children 12 years and under free. Tickets can be purchased online at http://artshow.co.nz/buy+tickets until July 17. Door sales are also available.

ENDS


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