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Jethro Tull: Extra Dates for Christchurch & Auckland

EXTRA DATES
ANNOUNCED FOR
CHRISTCHURCH
& AUCKLAND
NEW 17 Dec - CHRISTCHURCH - Isaac Theatre Royal at8pm
SOLD OUT 18 Dec - CHRISTCHURCH - Isaac Theatre Royal at8pm
SOLD OUT 19 Dec - WELLINGTON – St James Theatre at 8pm
SOLD OUT 20 Dec - AUCKLAND - The Civic at 8pm
NEW 21 Dec - AUCKLAND - The Civic at 8pm
New tickets on sale this THURSDAY

Due to overwhelming demand, two extra dates have been added to the THE BEST OF JETHRO TULL tour this December: Christchurch will have a second concert on 17 December and Auckland on 21 December.

Tickets to these new shows will go on sale this Thursday via Ticketek (Christchurch) and Ticketmaster (Auckland) and fans are urged to act quickly.

Promoters Stewart and Tricia Macpherson said they were thrilled with the response to the tour, with tickets selling out within minutes of going on sale last week.

“The demand for this act is phenomenal,” says Mr Macpherson. “We have been inundated by people who missed out so the band has agreed to re-route its travels to include these two extra dates. We are delighted and we know fans will be too.”

The concerts will be “best of”, featuring hits including Thick As A Brick, Living In The Past, Aqualung, Locomotive Breath, Bouree, new album Homo Erraticus and more. The three-concert tour caps a busy year of touring and a new album by the 60-million album selling Grammy award-winning rockers.

The concerts will be the first international rock concert to be staged at Christchurch’s newly rebuilt Isaac Theatre Royal.

Early in 1968, a group of young British musicians, born from the ashes of various failed regional bands gathered together in hunger, destitution and modest optimism in Luton, North of London.

Benefit, Aqualung, and Thick As A Brick followed and the band’s success grew internationally. Various band members came and went, but the charismatic front man and composer, flautist and singer Ian Anderson continued, as he does to this day, to lead the group through its various musical incarnations.

Jethro Tull were, by the mid-seventies, one of the most successful live performing acts on the world stage, rivalling Zeppelin, Elton John and even the Rolling Stones. Surprising, really, for a group whose more sophisticated and evolved stylistic extravagance was far from the Pop and Rock norm of that era.

With now some 30-odd albums to his credit and sales totalling more than 60 million, the apparently uncommercial Ian Anderson, continues to travel near and far to fans across the world.

Ian brings with him to New Zealand, his band of musicians featuring David Goodier on bass guitar, John O'Hara on keyboards, Florian Opahle on electric guitar, Scott Hammond on drums and Ryan O'Donnell on accompanying vocals.

He will perform a selection from the very best Jethro Tull songs plus some songs from his new album Homo Erraticus. Expect classics like, extended plays of Thick as a Brick, Aqualung, Locomotive Breath, Bouree, Living in the Past and much more.


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