Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Exhibition celebrates New Zealand's Maaori weavers

Major Exhibition celebrates New Zealand's finest traditional Maaori weavers

24 JUNE 2014

An extraordinary collection of traditional Maaori kaakahu (cloaks) and weaving from five generations of one family opens on 29 June as a major exhibition at Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato.

E Nga Uri Whakatupu - Weaving Legacies: Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa acknowledges and celebrates the life achievements of Dame Rangimarie Hetet (1892 – 1995) and her daughter, Diggeress Te Kanawa (1920 -2009). Their generosity of spirit and passion for the revival of Maaori women’s arts gave new life to traditional Maaori weaving in Aotearoa.

Waikato Museum director Cherie Meecham says this exhibition is significant in its celebration of Maaori women’s arts.

“Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa are acknowledged as New Zealand’s finest traditional Maaori weavers of the modern era.

“Many of the cloaks and weavings in the Hetet/Te Kanawa collection have been exhibited in New Zealand and overseas, but this is the very first time the entire collection of more than 75 items can be experienced in one place.”

The collection will be presented in two parts for the course of the exhibition.
The exhibition’s title and theme is inspired from the words of a waiata composed by Dame Rangimarie Hetet; a call for young Maaori to uphold and practice traditional knowledge to ensure its future.

Dan Te Kanawa says the whaanau are proud of the legacy left by Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa, and their lifelong commitment to foster the skills and knowledge of traditional Maaori weaving by working with others who shared their passion.

“My mother and grandmother never tired in their creative pursuits; trying new ideas, techniques and innovations but always adhering to the use of traditional materials and processes. They delighted in teaching those who shared their love of weaving, working directly with individuals and groups or through the organisations they supported.

“E Nga Uri Whakatupu will add another strand to the life achievements of Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa.”

E Nga Uri Whakatupu also acknowledges other Maaori weavers, such as Emily Schuster and the role of the Maori Women’s Welfare League (Te Ropu Wahine Maori Toko i te Ora), and Te Roopu Raranga Whatu o Aotearoa (National Maori Weavers’ Collective).

Dame Rangimarie Hetet and her daughter Diggeress Te Kanawa were founding members of these organisations which represented their passion for transferring essential weaving knowledge from one generation to the next, and the importance of developing the spiritual, social and economic wellbeing of Maaori women.

As exhibition partners, Maori Women’s Welfare League members will be involved in the coming months co-hosting events and workshops and as gallery hosts.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Fringe Review: Rossum’s Universal Robots

Written in 1920 by Karel Capek in a newly independent Czechoslovakia, its prophetic tale of artificial intelligence, automata and human morality was initially a big hit, but it then vanished from view, in New Zealand at least, before being revived in Hamilton last year. More>>

SELECT FRINGE SHOWS:

Pictures Of Media: Call For Photographs For Reimagining Journalism

In August this year Freerange Press is launching its next big book. This time we are gathering the best writers and thinkers in the country to look at the changing media landscape in New Zealand. To illuminate and give voice to the writing we want to include around 25 excellent photos. We want these photos to document the different aspects of how journalism is made, how it used to be, and how it is changing. More>>

Safer Internet Day: Keeping Safe Online More Important Than Ever

Tuesday 9 February marks Safer Internet Day. Safer Internet Day is designed to create awareness about the importance of Internet safety and encourages positive use of technology - with a strong focus on young people. More>>

ALSO:

We Have The Technology: Zephyrometer Up And Moving

“The needle’s stoppers had to be repaired because of the extra impact caused by the balance not being correct. We also added an extra 300kgs counter-balance – made from zinc coated steel triangle plates. These adjustments will now stop it bending low over the road in high winds.” More>>

ALSO:

Waitangi Day: Treaty Of Waitangi - Found In Translation

To celebrate the Society of Translators and Interpreters's 30th anniversary, over 90 translators will work together to translate the English and Māori versions of the Treaty of Waitangi into 30 languages... More>>

ALSO:

Northland Development: Trust Applauds $4m Government Funding For Art Centre

Today's announcement of central government support, made by Minister of Economic Development Steven Joyce, provides a key step forward in funding for Whangarei’s Hundertwasser Art Centre & Wairau Maori Art Gallery. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news