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Literary Notes strike a chord at Old St Paul’s

Literary Notes strike a chord at Old St Paul’s


What happens when music and literature collide? The synergy between the two will be explored in a unique series of conversations and performances at Wellington’s Old St Paul’s from next month.

Literary Notes – a creative partnership between two of Wellington most significant heritage features, Katherine Mansfield Birthplace and Old St Paul’s – combines two artforms in one stunning location, and the result will be very special, according to Old St Paul’s Manager Silke Bieda.

“We usually think about literature and music separately, but when they come together, the results can be stunning.”

The six part series begins on Thursday 17 July, with Steven Toussaint, American poet and author of Fiddlehead, exploring the compelling relationship between poetry and jazz, followed by wine, and music from Jazz group Percolator.

Other highlights will include founding member of The Verlaines and Head of the School of Music at Otago University, Dr Graeme Downes discussing recent compositions, why words are not enough and how Lorde helps him shake up his students (24 July).

On 7 August, recording artist, singer-songwriter Charlotte Yates shares the process of transforming Katherine Mansfield’s poems into musical compositions.

Emma Godwin, Director of Katherine Mansfield Birthplace, says the Birthplace has a strong tradition of public talks, and they wanted to reach a new audience this year.

“In this new collaboration with Old St Paul’s we’re able to host a larger audience and create a more lively experience that I’m sure people will love.”

The series will be wrapped up on 21 August, with Hinemoana Baker, musician, poet and 2014 Victoria University of Wellington/Creative New Zealand Writer in Residence, sharing her favourite poems and songs in an “exploration of what is better left unsaid”.

A full programme of events is online at www.heritage.org.nz/news-and-events/events/literary-notes.

Where: Old St Paul's, 34 Mulgrave St Wellington

When: Every Thursday 17 July – 21 August at 6pm (doors open 5.30pm)

Entry: Gold coin. Licenced bar and snacks available for purchase.

ends

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