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Rhythm And Vines Brings Glastonbury to 2014 Festival

Rhythm And Vines Brings Glastonbury to 2014 Festival




Rhythm and Vines is excited to announce it will be adding a little slice of Glastonbury to the 2014 festival with the inclusion of the Arcadia Afterburner.

The Arcadia Afterburner stage has been a regular feature at Glastonbury Festival, and now Rhythm and Vines is bring it to New Zealand’s biggest New Year’s Eve party in Gisborne.

New Zealand fans of Glastonbury no longer have to look on with envy as UK festival-goers descend on Worthy Farm for the weekend of their lives.

Rhythm and Vines will continue it’s pedigree of bringing the world’s hottest acts to the festival and is set to become a party destination yet again for the electronic dance music crowd who descend on Gisborne every year. The Arcadia Afterburner will house some of these DJ’s until the early hours of 2015. Previous artist highlights at Rhythm and Vines include Disclosure, Netsky, Wilkinson and Flying Lotus. This year will be no different with some of the world’s best electronic dance acts booked to play. More on what international DJ’s will be playing the Afterburner structure will be revealed during the first line up announcement.

Custom made and originally born out of a cowshed in Dorset, the Arcadia Afterburner fuses elements of sculpture, architecture, fire, music and lighting to build a multi sensory experience.

The unique stage will house a 4000 strong dance floor, with a DJ booth at the core of the structure, a towering spire that fires 30 foot flames into the air, flaming tree sculptures, and a barrage of light and visuals that shoot out across the crowd in synchronization. Surrounded by a heavyweight sound system, the spiraling arms of the Afterburner reach into the crowd creating multi level dance platforms along them.

This is the first time the Arcadia Afterburner has been to these shores and it is like no other DJ stage seen in New Zealand before.

The Arcadia Afterburner Features

- 6 stack surround sound
- Stage for MC’s and Performers
- Musically timed flame effects
- DJ Booth
- 6 flaming tree sculptures
- Raised dance platforms


ends

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